Wine Isn’t the Only Option for Deglazing

Wine isn’t the only option for deglazing a pan. None of us want to miss that tasty brown crust lining our skillet or pan. Some of the most complex flavors lie there just waiting to add flavor to the dish. Deglazing is the process of adding liquid to the hot pan to release those delicious morsels. It’s common to use wine to deglaze, but it isn’t the only option.

While I don’t mind using wine if I have a bottle open, I don’t want to uncork one just to deglaze. Other suitable liquids are chicken stock, beef stock, vegetable stock, pot likker, milk, cream, nut milk, coconut milk, coffee, and water. I try to use something that will complement the flavors of the dish or sauce I’m preparing. I might even use peppermint tea when cooking lamb.

One way to approach this is to choose a liquid that will be included in that or a similar dish. Coconut milk is excellent to use after stir frying chicken for curry. Of course, chicken stock would work as well since the base of the dish is chicken.

I often use pot likker from Cooking2Thrive Killer Beans to deglaze beef I’m cooking for tacos, burritos, or enchiladas. The beans are seasoned with chile peppers and cumin so I’m enhancing the flavors that I’ll use to season my dish.

There are some combinations that may be best to avoid. I wouldn’t use coffee with chicken, but I don’t hesitate to use it with red meat and in brown gravy. And I can’t think of a time I’ve ever used vinegar as a deglazing liquid. If you’re unsure which flavor profile will work best, use a tool like “The Flavor Bible” or do a quick internet search.

Since the goal is simply to remove the caramelized food that is stuck to the pan, use a minimal amount of liquid. I usually pour in a little, stir with a spatula, then add a little more liquid if needed to dislodge any remaining remnants.

When making a sauce, you may desire more liquid in the end, but I deglaze first, remove the main dish ingredient, and allow any remaining deglazing liquid to evaporate before adding a thickener. From that point, I stir the thickener into the fat until it’s smooth and then add the liquid that forms the base of my sauce. After that, I allow my sauce to simmer and reduce. If I add all of the liquid when I deglaze the pan, I end up making my job more difficult.

If your dish doesn’t require a sauce, but needs a little something, something you can add a can of Rotel® Diced Tomatoes & Green Chilies and use the liquid to deglaze. When I do this, I don’t treat it as a sauce, I just dump them in and stir to deglaze. The same can be done with tomato juice, tomato sauce, or strained tomatoes when making chili.

In the past few days, I’ve deglazed numerous pans and I haven’t had to open a bottle of wine. I’ve used chicken stock (already open & in the refrigerator), coconut milk (already open and in the refrigerator), and water instead. And there were other workable options in my pantry.

 So, if you’d rather have your wine in a glass, you’re in luck. Wine isn’t the only option for deglazing.

Author: Cheri Thriver

Hello, Cheri Thriver here blogging about cooking, thriving, and the intersection of the two. I’ve been living a gluten-free lifestyle for over 15 years. I understand that it’s rarely a lack of knowledge or the availability of appropriate food that keeps us from making healthy choices. More often than not, it’s an emotional connection, previous trauma, or fear of social reprisal that keeps us stuck. My wish is that you’ll find something here that informs, entertains, or inspires you to change anything that needs to be changed for you to live fully and thrive.

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