Boost Your Iron Intake By Eating Pasta

mac & cheeseIf you’re not a big supplement fan, but want to boost your iron intake, grab a bowl of pasta. Really? Yes, really. And you probably thought I was going to tell you to eat your spinach or, even worse, liver. Nope, if you choose the right pasta, you can get as much as 33% of the recommended daily dietary allowance for iron from a 2 oz serving of pasta. How great is that?!

Most of us are at least vaguely aware that we need to consume iron so that we produce lots of healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen through our system. If you don’t absorb enough iron and can’t produce enough red blood cells, you develop iron deficiency anemia.

Without enough oxygen due to anemia, your body will become fatigued and your brain and immune system functions may diminish. A lack of iron may also prevent your body from maintaining or producing healthy cells, skin, hair, or nails.

For most of us, low iron levels will be avoided by simply consuming sufficient iron in our diet, but almost 10% of women in the US are iron deficient. In fact, according to WebMD(1), low iron is the most common nutritional deficiency in the US.

Pasta seems like a natural part of the solution for this deficiency. For one thing, we eat a lot of pasta. What kid doesn’t like mac & cheese, or spaghetti? Food Network lists both of these pasta dishes in their list “America’s Best: Top 10 Comfort Foods”. For another thing, pastas high in iron are readily available.

pastaNot every type of pasta is high in iron, but those made of chickpeas or lentils are filled with it. Banza® Rotini delivers 30% of the daily value in a 2 oz portion and 50% in a 3 oz portion. Tolerant® Organic Red Lentil Penne also delivers 50% in a 3 oz portion. These pastas are gluten-free and they deliver a healthy portion of protein and fiber. They are also lower in net carbs than pastas made from wheat flour, corn, or rice. This makes them a good choice for those with, or at risk for, diabetes.

While a sophisticated palette may detect some differences, these pastas are pleasing enough for most of us especially when covered in cheese or red sauce. Why fight with yourself over eating liver or spinach when you can chow down on the mac and cheese you really wanted anyway? Go ahead, have a helping of pasta and boost your iron.


https://www.healthambition.com/8-ways-increase-iron-levels/

1)http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/features/iron-supplements

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/photos/americas-best-top-10-comfort-foods.html

http://www.eatbanza.com/pages/our-pasta

http://tolerantfoods.com/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Get Your Ducks in a Row with this Gluten-Free Pasta!

ducks in a row

Even your kids will want to get their ducks in a row with this duck-shaped gluten-free pasta. The raw ducks make for an enjoyable math lesson prior to cooking and an art lesson while your child eats. Made from nothing but corn flour and water,these adorable ducks can be used in soup, with a sauce, or to stretch a one-pot meal.

As often happens, I found this pasta while shopping for something else in a store I don’t usually frequent. The bright green bag full of Sam Mills Pasta for Kids boasts that these ducks are free from Gluten, GMOs, Dairy, Cholesterol, Egg, Sugar, Yeast, Soy, Sodium, and Nuts. They’re even Kosher. And they’re made in Romania for a bit of foreign flair to boot.

pasta for kids

One serving contains 194 calories, .5 grams of fat, 44.2 grams of carbohydrate, 2 grams of dietary fiber, and 3.1 grams of protein. That seems like a large carb count, but the bag also promises a low glycemic index of less than 40. There are 6 servings per 12 oz. bag

After a mere 8 minutes in boiling water, the ducks are tender and ready to swim in a meat sauce or chicken soup. As long as it’s not overcooked, the pasta retains its shape nicely. Like other corn pastas, both the flavor and texture are benign. Your kids will be happy to eat it and to share with their gluten-eating buddies.

pasta in bowl

I don’t often eat pasta, but I like to have some in the house for those moments when I need a quick filler. This particular item offers a high fun factor and little to object to so it is more than adequate to fill that role.

Sam Mills offers a wide range of gluten-free products including an alphabet pasta with the same positive attributes. Once our ducks are in a row, let’s get the kids in the kitchen for some pasta and word play!

 

 

http://www.sammills.ro/sammillsusa-en.html

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Gluten-Free Pasta With No Calories! What?

Love to eat pasta, but want to avoid the calories and carbs? With Shirataki Noodles you can do both!

Shirataki Noodles
Shirataki Noodles

Sound too good to be true? I know, right. So I decided to do a little research to see just what these noodles are made of.

Shirataki noodles originated in Southeast Asia and are made of glucomannan derived from the tubular roots of the Konjac plant. This exotic plant is also known as Konnyaku, devil’s tongue, vodoo lily, and elephant yam.

Konjac Plant
Konjac Plant

Glucomannan is a polysaccharide (sugar) sometimes used as a thickener or gelling agent as well as a supplement for weight loss and blood sugar control. It is Gluten-Free, Kosher, Vegan, and Paleo Diet friendly, but because of its molecular structure, not compatible with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

Noodles made from water, glucomannan, and pickling lime (calcium hydroxide) contain NO fat, NO cholesterol, NO sodium, NO sugars, and less than 1 gram of carbohydrates per 3 ounce serving. They also contain NO calories.

Keep in mind, that’s no calories for a 3 oz serving, which in labeling language means 5 calories or less per serving. If you eat numerous servings, you will be adding some calories and a significant amount of water-soluble fiber (not dietary fiber) to your diet.

This fiber can be difficult to digest, so it’s probably best not to rely on Shirataki Noodles as a primary part of your diet; however, it is a great pasta alternative that feels satisfying in spite of its lack of calories and contains more iron in a serving than one 130 calorie serving of golden raisins.

I know, I know. You’re more concerned about how they taste. Ever heard someone describe grits as that thing on your plate that tastes like whatever it’s next to? These noodles could be described in a similar way. They have virtually no taste on their own, but they do carry the flavor of seasoning or sauce.

If you’re sensitive to food odors, you’ll want to avoid smelling the pickling liquid as you drain it from the package. Once you’ve rinsed the noodles in water and then boiled them, there’s no remaining odd smell.

So, are Shirataki noodles too good to be true? Well, it’s hard to beat a pasta with no calories or carbs!  I like the light texture of the fettuccini style noodles and I love it that they cook in one minute. There’s plenty of variety in the choices available: angel hair, ziti, and rice style plus spinach angel hair. The local price runs $3.29 per 7 or 8 oz package depending on the style of noodle. I think they’re a great alternative for gluten-free pasta dishes, but I’m curious what you think? Pick up a package of Shiratakis and let me know.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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