Posts tagged ‘ribs’

July 22, 2019

Braise then Graze

This year, I’ve been known to braise then graze. Most often, I bake fish; broil or bake beef and pork; and bake or boil chicken, but my favorite preparation may be to braise! Earlier this year, I braised some steak I dredged in gluten-free flour and cooked with a flavorful broth. The result inadvertently mimicked my grandmother’s beef and noodles. In fact, my sister, who thought this was a deliberate replication said, “You nailed it! You can fix this for my birthday,” when she sampled the dish. I confessed it was a happy accident.

One of the benefits of braising is the tenderness of the meat when it’s done. My grandmother used a pressure cooker to achieve this effect. Pressure cookers scare me. I always visualize food on the ceiling that has spewed through the valve at the top. I think I’ll stick with braising.
ribs
The other day, I had some country style pork ribs on hand and lots of rain outside. I wasn’t willing to fight the elements to use the grill so I decided to braise the ribs. I can’t say this was a well-thought plan. It is more aptly described as a few decisions based on convenience. I threw some balsamic vinegar, tamari, and a splash of olive oil in an enameled cast iron pot and added a little sugar. The mixture tasted pleasantly salty with a subtle tang.

I placed the pot over medium heat and allowed it to come to a boil while I stirred until the sugar melted. I then placed each rib, unseasoned, into the liquid and immediately turned it so that both sides were coated. Once all of the ribs were in place, I added a large stem of fresh mint leaves for an aromatic top note.

As I began the braising, I had the thought that the flavor profile would have been a good choice for lamb. I wasn’t sure how it would play with pork, but I always throw things together and hope for the best. Usually, it works out.

Braising can be done in the oven or on top of the stove. I used the top of the stove. The idea is to keep the heat low and cook for a long time. I placed the covered pot over a very low flame and set the timer for an hour. Once the hour had passed, I turned the ribs again, sprinkled in a little cayenne, mignonette pepper, and garlic powder for good measure, gave it a stir and continued to cook for another hour.

The results fall off the bone as expected with this cooking technique. The color is dark, almost black, and the flavor rich. There’s plenty of salt from the tamari. There’s no noticeable sweetness, but the sugar has helped create the illusion of caramelization that makes the burned edges of barbecue so appealing.

The flavor is not wholly familiar. It’s lacking any mustard or tomato base that would be typically associated with country style ribs. And of course there’s no smokiness. Nonetheless, the ribs are satisfying and delicious.

I’ll make these ribs again to nail down the actual measurements for a recipe, then we’ll test that recipe a few times to make any needed changes before it is approved for publication. All Cooking2Thrive original recipes are tested a minimum of three times. Some are tested many more.

Once the recipe is perfected, all you’ll have to do is follow the instructions to braise then graze!
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June 27, 2018

What’s Your Favorite Summer Cover-Up?

What’s your favorite summer cover-up? It’s summer & time for the beach. You may have a beach cover-up, but what about your food? Sometimes it can use a good cover-up too!

As we approach the 4th of July, I’m dreaming of slow cooked ribs, smoked pork butt, burgers blackened on the grill, salmon and corn covered in grill marks, and because it’s hot, ice cream for dessert! All of these are delicious simply seasoned with herbs and spices, but this year I think I’d rather slather them until they’re covered in sticky goodness. 
grill
The question is, what cover-up will I choose for a rack of tender ribs? Actually, I may cheat on this one. My lawn care man has promised to deliver a sample of his newly created BBQ sauce. He describes it as tangy & spicy. Those are the qualities I prefer in BBQ sauce and his is getting rave reviews from friends.

Purists may prefer only Memphis-style dry rub on their ribs. I like them rubbed and then basted with a thick sauce that caramelizes on the edges. This only applies to ribs. I want my pork butt covered up after it’s put on my plate if I cover it at all.

For variety, I like mango salsa or sauce, you might prefer apple, apricot, peach, plum, or strawberry. I want to try a cherry based sauce or possibly a mixture of sweet cherries and raspberry. In my head, pineapple sounds like a good compliment to cherries and raspberry, but I’ll have to do a taste test to see if it works like I think it will. Orange might work better.

Moving on to the pork butt, I think I’ll shred the meat and cover it with slaw. Mayonnaise and vinegar cabbage coleslaw is probably the most common version served with pulled pork. I’m going to use my mom’s vinegar coleslaw recipe.

Mom’s Cabbage Slaw

2 large heads of cabbage, shredded
6 or 7 white or red onions, grated or finely minced
2 cups sugar
1/4 cup salt
1 3/4 cups salad oil
1 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons dry mustard
2 tablespoons celery seed
Fresh ground black pepper

In large bowl, combine cabbage onion, sugar, and salt. Toss and set aside.

In saucepan, combine oil, vinegar, dry mustard, and celery seed and bring to boil.

Once cabbage has produced juice (about 5 minutes), drain it through a colander, then place in large bowl. Pour the boiling dressing mixture over drained cabbage. Add fresh ground black pepper and toss with a fork.

Allow to sit until cool. Cover and place in refrigerator for at least 8 hours prior to serving.

I’m going to keep the burgers homestyle as well by mixing Cavender’s All Purpose Greek Seasoning into the meat. Homestyle? Well, not for everybody, but this blend of 13 spices and seasonings originated in my hometown and was always in our pantry. When I was a kid, a glass jar of Cavender’s was a standard Christmas gift for relatives who lived far away and could not purchase it in their local stores. I don’t think they have the glass jars anymore, but the seasoning is still tasty. For a light touch, I’ll serve the burgers with thinly sliced seedless cucumbers and tzatziki.

Honey glazed salmon sounds appealing. Salmon can handle some strong flavors. I often feel like what I’m served in restaurants is under seasoned. A good dose of salt, pepper, garlic, and lemon or lime along with the honey should give me moist, full-flavored salmon.

I really can’t think of a better cover-up for corn than butter. If the corn is sweet & fresh, I’ll skip the salt and just use salted butter. Anything else seems to detract rather than enhance.

Now, for dessert! Obviously, there are hundreds of ice cream topping choices. I prefer fresh fruit or chocolate or a combination of the two, but rather than limit my friends to my choices, it’s easy to set out small dishes of shredded coconut, a variety of chopped nuts, cookie pieces, cereal, fruit and chocolate sauce. I make them all gluten-free so I can enjoy any leftovers.

Truthfully, most of this is long-term planning. This 4th comes on the heels of too many months of family caregiving to make the actual execution sound appealing. I think I’ll choose a mindless float in the pool. Nonetheless, I’m excited about the ideas!

The 4th of July will come around again next year. Maybe that will be a good time to invite a few friends over to enjoy a favorite summer cover-up!

https://greekseasoning.com/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/?s=cole+slaw

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”