Posts tagged ‘NFL’

January 27, 2019

Super Bowl Party Food That’s Good for Your Vision

As we count down the days to the big game, let’s explore some Super Bowl Party Food that’s good for your vision. If you saw the Rams/Saints game last week, you know how important vision can be.
eyes
When you think of food that’s good for your eyes, you probably think of carrots. I’m pretty sure that’s the only food my parents and grandparents touted as vision enhancing. Carrots are high in beta-carotene that your body turns into vitamin A that is essential for good vision.

Preformed vitamin A or provitamin A carotenoids can also be found in red bell peppers, broccoli, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, pistachios, cantaloupe, mangoes, grapefruit, kale, spinach, egg yolks, tuna, and beef liver. My grandmother thought I should eat liver, but she said it was for the iron.

Since you’ll want a clear view of the plays, calls, and commercials next week and next year, Super Bowl Sunday is the perfect time to create a menu high in vitamin A. Here are five items to consider adding to the menu:

Melon Kabobs
For a light touch, skewer cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon balls with fresh mint leaves in between. If you want something more substantial, add balls of fresh mozzarella and folded pieces of prosciutto and drizzle with basil vinaigrette. If you prefer no dressing, alternate leaves of basil and mint between the fruit, cheese, and meat on the skewer.

Greyhound or Salty Dog
If you can find good grapefruit in the winter, serving up vitamin A is no harder than shaking a cocktail. I always use fresh grapefruit and I rarely bother to squeeze them in advance. I just squeeze the fresh juice right into my martini glass. I prefer mixing with Grey Goose® Vodka, but you can use gin if you prefer. The addition of a salted rim turns these Greyhounds into Salty Dogs.

Deviled Eggs
Deviled eggs are already popular Super Bowl fare, so you can’t go wrong serving them. Everyone has a favorite version. Whatever yours is will provide vitamin A so there’s no need to vary.

Mango Salsa
The great thing about choosing mango salsa is that it can include red bell peppers to make it even higher in vitamin A. You can dip it with the same tortilla chips that are on the table to dip into cheese dip, guacamole, or layer dip.

Chocolate Pistachio Popcorn
Popcorn is fast, easy, and cheap. Add pistachios, dried apricot and/or dried pineapple pieces and a dark chocolate drizzle and you can add decadent to the description.

If you don’t like dark chocolate, use white chocolate. Just melt the chocolate and drizzle over the top of popped popcorn, dried fruit, and nuts that have been spread out on a parchment covered cookie sheet. Place in the freezer a few minutes to let the chocolate harden then break into chunks and serve.

Any of the five can be served along with the ever-popular chicken wings. No need to upset your party guests by eliminating a favorite before an emotionally charged game.

I can’t really predict who will win or even who will have the most effective commercial. I can predict that I’ll be having a good time and some good food! I hope you do as well!

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/

https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/where-is-2019-super-bowl-location-date-time-tv-channel-streaming-everything-to-know-about-patriots-vs-rams/

https://www.therams.com/

https://www.patriots.com/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/finally-learned-pop-popcorn/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

September 17, 2014

Can you stop just existing and thrive? You can, and you are worth it.

Can you stop just existing and thrive? You can, and you are worth it, but you may not be living that way because you may not believe it way down deep. Why do so many of us feel so bad about ourselves?

In this age of headlines and 24/7 talking heads we lunge from crisis to crisis. Our culture is swept up in rivers of bad news, glaring failures, dissatisfaction, and united finger pointing at whomever we can identify as a potential villain. NFL players have taken the stage this week led by Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson.

What has resulted is a narrow focus on the behavior of professional athletes. Not even women’s rights advocates have suggested that all professions should purge their halls of those who physically assault their partners or children. Why is the NFL special? Let’s purge elementary schools, colleges, newsrooms, courts, churches, investment firms, manufacturing facilities, the trucking industry, pipe fitters, doctor’s offices and mental health facilities as well. If we don’t, what point are we making?

And that’s my point. Most of the time, it feels like we’re just finger pointing and creating a villain of the moment – someone who can make us feel better about ourselves while we contrast our public behavior from theirs. What we sometimes forget is that most of the violent incidents we see aired were not believed to be public. They were private moments. We know this and if we’re willing to tell ourselves the truth, we know that we would not look good if our most vile or shameful moments were plastered on a TV screen.

All of us have erred. All of us feel shame. In this commonality of human experience we can find compassion, empathy, and healing or we can find condemnation, comparison, and hate – peacefulness or warmongering.

The problem with focusing our energy on the condemnation of other people in order to make ourselves feel better, or momentarily superior, is that this behavior systematically prevents our own improvement. As we elevate ourselves in contrast with others, we become less and less willing to admit when we have erred in a similar manner for fear that an astute observer may remember our prior condemnation of this behavior and hold us accountable. We will go to great lengths to support our fantasy that we not like those we vilify.

As we feel the internal conflict inherently created by trying to live a fantasy, we are forced to disassociate from our authentic feelings and real truth. Until we reconnect with these, we simply cannot live fully. We will be able to make superficial change, but our inner turmoil will remain. We will never thrive.

Unfortunately, many of us are products of family systems that denied our reality. We had mothers who failed to report our injuries from our father’s physical violence, or fathers who failed to acknowledge the real danger we experienced when our mother passed out and almost burned the house down with us in it. Of course there are millions of versions of this story. The point is that when our family systems normalize this behavior while simultaneously requiring us to hide it, we are trained early on to deny the truth of our experience.

With a cultural bias toward public condemnation and universal opportunities presented by social media to anonymously criticize, it can feel daunting to embrace your truth, especially when it doesn’t match up with social convention. So many of us develop a habit of selling ourselves short.

If we grew up as targets of abusers, we may carry this a step further. The scenario goes something like this: deny our truth, sell ourselves short, blame someone else for holding us back, feel angry, release that anger in inappropriate ways or use it as a defense that prevents us from receiving love and support, suffer the consequences of our behavior or perceived lack of support and continue to make choices that cause us to feel like a victim. Victims do not recognize their power. If they did, they would not choose to continue to live like victims.

If you are existing rather than thriving, we support your desire for change! No matter who you are or what you have done, you deserve appreciation and love. We cry with you as you grieve your losses. We accept your less than perfect behavior even when we can’t condone it. We understand that when we tell ourselves the truth, you are the same as we are and given similar circumstances we are capable of making the same choice you have made.

Forget what you think you “should” do. We encourage you to do at least one thing each day that makes you feel free, safe, happy, light, or content. We also encourage you to allow yourself to feel your anger, fear, sadness, and longing in order to begin the process of letting it go. You do not need permission or approval to embrace the unique gifts and journey you have been given. They are your birthright.

It does not matter how many times you have been told you are worthless. Repetition does not make it true. Whoever told you that was lying to you to make you believe you are powerless. It does not matter how much time you’ve spent alone because a parent did not nurture you. You deserve love, attention, and affection and there are people who will show you love when you find the courage to let down your defenses. You are not valuable because of what you achieve or what you own. You are valuable because you are here. Let your legacy be how fully you live. If your energy is consumed by attaining material wealth at the sacrifice of your relationships or your health, you are living a life limited by material possessions. Such an existence may appear full from the outside, but you know the hollowness inside the facade.

The path to thriving is not all easy, but it is all worth it. No matter where you began or what you have endured, today begins with a choice. You can choose to live your truth or you can be confined by someone else’s. Can you stop just existing and thrive? Yes you can, and you deserve it. The truth you choose will determine whether you exist or whether you thrive.

Epilogue:
When you need a bit of inspiration, check out the stories of these survivors of violence, neglect, and abuse who have found a way to move past horrific events in order to thrive. Know someone else inspiring? Share with us in the comments below.

ESmart

Elizabeth Smart

IVanzant

Iyanla Vanzant

PConroy

Pat Conroy


JWalls

Jeanette Walls


OWinfrey

Oprah Winfrey

BClinton

Bill Clinton


RBritten

Rhonda Britten

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”