Posts tagged ‘milk’

October 16, 2018

Soup’s On!

Cooler weather is finally here, so soup’s on – literally! When that first blast of cold air hits each fall, everyone I know starts to clamor for soup. From chili to chowder, hot thick soup fills and warms your tummy and is the perfect antidote for a chill.
tomato soup
Soup preference is often determined by the base of the soup. Some prefer broth or stock, some tomato, and some cream. This is reflected in the top five soups sold in America – chicken noodle, tomato, clam chowder, potato, and minestrone.

Of course the choices don’t stop there. There’s tortilla soup, French onion soup, chicken and rice, chicken chili, split pea, lentil, butternut squash, corn chowder, beef stew, ham and bean, lobster bisque, gumbo, vegetable, Thai chicken coconut soup, and phở. The possible combinations are seemingly endless.

My grandmother made her own chicken stock and canned her own tomato juice. These became the base for soup at her house. Most of us don’t feel like we can spend 2-3 hours in the kitchen prepping the base for a soup. That doesn’t mean the only way to have a delicious soup for dinner is to pop open a can or have some delivered.

A great soup can begin with ingredients you usually discard. Vegetable broth from fresh green beans, black beans, butternut squash, cabbage, greens, and even sour kraut can serve as a flavorful base.

You can also boil potato skins, and asparagus, mushroom, broccoli, and cauliflower stems that would normally go in the trash or composter in a separate pot at the same time you prepare those vegetables. You’re using veggie pieces that result from prep you’re already doing and you’re cooking during a time you’ll already be around the kitchen. That makes for a time friendly, budget friendly practice.

Put the resulting broth in a large glass jar in the refrigerator and save it for soup. You can add broth from multiple vegetables over several days to deepen the flavor and nutritional value.

Your broth can also include chicken skin, hearts, livers, and gizzards, or fat trimmed from beef, pork, or chicken. If you prefer, you can place these in a slow cooker with some water, onion, seasonings and vegetables to create broth while you’re at work. You’re going to discard everything but the liquid so don’t worry that the ingredients are ugly things you wouldn’t eat on their own.

When I am too taxed to have the capacity for planning soup in advance, I use prepared items from the grocery to get me started. My favorites are Pomi Tomatoes, Imagine Free Range Organic Chicken Broth, and milk. I always have these items around.

pomiPomi Strained Tomatoes are just that. Tomatoes. There’s nothing added – no water, no salt, no preservatives. For a healthy soup base with a long shelf life and no prep time, it doesn’t get much better than that.

Imagine Free Range Organic Chicken Broth is available from any store at which I shop. It comes in a low sodium version. The ingredients are: organic chicken broth (filtered water, organic chicken), organic onions, organic celery, organic carrots, natural chicken flavor, organic spices, sea salt. The only thing suspect here is “natural chicken flavor”, but there’s no MSG, no sugar, no yeast extract and the natural chicken flavor isn’t at the top of the list of ingredients. Truthfully, I don’t always buy the low sodium version.

I don’t always have cream on hand, but with a 2-year-old around I consistently have whole milk. It may not be quite as rich as cream, but it gets the job done in potato soup or corn chowder.

I also keep rice in the pantry, curry in the spice rack, onions and garlic on the counter, and herbs growing in pots on the back porch or in the house. All of these can be used to flavor or enhance soup.

The temperature in my house has dropped 10 degrees in the last hour, but I’m in luck. I have chicken breasts in the refrigerator, chicken broth and rice in the pantry, an onion and fresh garlic, some English peas and some rosemary. With those and some salt and pepper, I can make soup for dinner.

It won’t be long before soup’s on!

https://solesoups.com/2017/02/17/top-five-bestselling-soups-america/

https://www.pomi.us.com/en-us/products/#strained-tomatoes

https://www.fooducate.com/app#!page=product&id=9EBAF56C-E113-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/why-did-your-grandma-make-chicken-soup/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/dump-soup-perfect-for-a-lazy-day/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/travel-tip-12-cold-soups-vary-different-countries/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

July 31, 2018

Eating Her Curds and Whey

spiderSpiders may not be the current danger for Little Miss Muffet when she eats her curds and whey. Last week, several snack cracker recalls centered around possible salmonella contamination of the ingredient whey. If you’re familiar with the nursery rhyme, you probably instinctively associate whey with milk or milk products, but what exactly is it?

Whey is the liquid that remains after you strain curdled milk. In food manufacturing, it is a byproduct of making cheese. Cheddar and Swiss cheeses leave sweet whey and cottage cheese and yogurt leave acid or sour whey.

When cheese was made at home, the remaining whey could be substituted for milk in baking. Even now, I sometimes use the liquid from yogurt in baked goods. Whey was also consumed as a beverage with honey and alcohol.

In US commercial food manufacturing, whey was a waste product dumped into rivers until the US government prohibited such dumping. Faced with a disposal problem, manufacturers began to look for other ways to use it. They first developed a filler for ice cream.

hawaiianWhey’s use as a filler in convenience foods grew from there. It is now found in products that may or may not have inhabited my snack bin – things like King’s Hawaiian Bread, Cheetos, Ritz Sandwich Crackers, Goldfish Crackers, Nature Valley Protein Bars, Luna Protein Bars, Oatmega Protein Bars, Swiss Rolls, and Similac Pro-Advance Infant Formula. Whey has also become a nutritional supplement popular with bodybuilders because of its leucine content.

The primary components of whey are water, lactose, protein, fat, and amino acids. The proteins include beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, lactoferrin, and immunoglobulins.

Three types of whey protein are produced in the food industry – Whey Protein Concentrate, Whey Protein Isolate, and Hydrolyzed Whey Protein. In theory, whey protein isolate can be safely consumed if you have lactose intolerance, but other forms of whey protein may cause symptoms.

Like most milk in the grocery store, the whey contained in convenience foods is typically pasteurized to make it less likely to harbor bacteria and safer to consume. Unfortunately, as we have recently seen, it can still become contaminated during manufacturing or packaging.

It’s no secret that I prefer fresh food prepared at home. I think it tastes better, and I feel better knowing what’s in the food. Of course that doesn’t mean that all my food will be free from a risk of salmonella, listeria, E. coli, or other contaminants.

And real life means that I sometimes reach for convenience foods. Of course, I read the labels. I have to make sure they’re free of gluten and shrimp. Right now, I’m making sure they’re free of whey.

https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/

http://wheyproteininstitute.org/facts/howwheyismade/wheyproteincomponents

http://www.liquidirish.com/2012/05/whey-alcohol.html

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/whey-protein-101#what-is-it

https://www.ampi.com/home/page/130

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

June 11, 2018

Lactose Intolerance and Celiac Disease Go Hand-in-Hand

If you have Celiac Disease, it’s good to be aware that lactose intolerance and Celiac Disease go hand-in-hand. When your gut is healing, it’s sometimes hard to determine where intestinal distress originates. This can be frustrating when you’re diligently eliminating gluten from your diet, but still experiencing symptoms. Before you’re tempted to give up on a gluten-free lifestyle, perhaps it’s time to explore the possibility of lactose intolerance.
lactose
Lactose is a sugar found in milk. This disaccharide is composed of two simple sugars – glucose and galactose. Our bodies use an enzyme called lactase to break down glucose. Lactase is secreted by the villi in the intestine. We produce more of this enzyme as infants because human milk is high in lactose, but some adults produce enough lactase to tolerate milk. Others do not. Those with Celiac Disease may have significant damage to the villi in the intestine. This can affect lactase secretion resulting in secondary lactose intolerance.

How do I know if I have lactose intolerance?

The symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, gas, gurgling and rumbling, diarrhea, and nausea that appear on average from 30 minutes to two hours after consuming milk or milk products.

Depending on your sensitivity, you may not recognize that milk and milk products are causing the problem. The connection may not be as direct as drink one glass of milk = all symptoms appear. Your symptoms may be related to the amount of lactose you consume.

One cup of whole milk contains approximately 12 grams of lactose. That 12 grams may not cause symptoms, but an added bowl of ice cream may put you in distress.

Can I still drink milk?

Drinking milk may make you miserable, but it does not cause damage to your intestine even if you’re lactose intolerant. If you want to drink milk, but don’t want to take the risk of embarrassing symptoms, there are lactose-free dairy products available. Another option is to increase the lactase in your system by taking a lactase enzyme pill.
lactaid
What should I avoid?

To limit your lactose intake, avoid:
Milk
Cream
Buttermilk
Sour Cream
Ice Cream
Sherbet
Evaporated or Condensed Milk
Hot Chocolate Mixes
Milk Chocolate
Malted Milk
Cream or Milk Stout (beer)
Soft and Processed Cheeses like ricotta, cottage cheese, cream cheese, Farmers cheese, queso fresco, cheese foods or cheese spreads
Cheese dip
Yogurt (unless you make it and let it ferment for at least 24 hours)
Whey
Gravy
Cream Soups
Alfredo Sauce
Béchamel
Instant potatoes
Mashed potatoes (unless you make them)
Bread, muffins, biscuits, rolls, pancakes, waffles, and crackers (read labels)
Ranch dressing
Cheese flavoring (read labels)
Other creamy salad dressings (read labels)

Can I have any dairy products?

Some dairy products have minimal amounts of lactose and are fine to consume. These include butter, aged cheeses like cheddar, Parmesan, provolone, or Swiss. Homemade yogurt that is allowed to ferment for 24 hours will break down all of the lactose into unharmful lactic acid. Fresh cheese made by draining this yogurt is also safe to consume. When in doubt, read the label, ask the chef, or make it yourself.

The easiest way to know whether your food contains dairy products is to make it yourself. In a restaurant, you can ask the chef or baker. If you have Celiac Disease, you most likely have lots of practice with this. You are also most likely an excellent label reader and are aware that milk is one of the top 8 allergens required to be listed on packaged products in the US.

It’s always disappointing to consider eliminating another category of foods if you’ve already eliminated gluten. At least with lactose, you have the option of taking enzymes to counteract the symptoms.

I’d have to say, I hate a stomach ache enough that I’m willing to endure lots of diet revisions in order to avoid one. I can’t think of a single roll, doughnut, cake, or even ice cream (and I love ice cream) worth the pain.

If you have Celiac Disease and continuing pain, it’s good to remember that Celiac Disease and lactose intolerance go hand-in-hand. This could be the secret to ending your abdominal pain.

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/lactose-intolerance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose

https://www.drugs.com/cg/lactose-free-diet.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaccharide

https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Allergens/ucm106890.htm