Posts tagged ‘gentrifying’

July 31, 2019

Forty Ounce Rosé Plus Gluten-Free Breton Original Crackers

40Forty Ounce Rosé plus gluten-free Breton® Crackers feels like a representative combination for happy hour in my gentrifying neighborhood. About thirteen years ago, I moved into a four-block neutral zone between the Crips and the Bloods located in the historic neighborhood that houses my state’s governor’s mansion. Forty-ounce bottles of malt liquor or beer could be purchased a block away. A decent bottle of wine and upscale crackers required driving several miles.

After 30 years of “getting better” (but not really), the neighborhood has begun to change. I haven’t had a break-in or drive-by shooting at my home in about three years. Many young couples with small children live nearby. It’s only a few blocks to new green-built urban farmhouses and shipping container homes. A distillery and craft-beer maker have relocated within walking distance. We have a farmer’s market, performance venue, restaurants, two bakeries, a creamery, local retail, and a museum.

Many of my neighbors sit on the front porch in the evening. There’s almost always a light breeze. A generous pour of chilled Forty Ounce Rosé in my glass makes for a refreshing accompaniment to relaxing on the porch.

Forty Ounce Rosé is a French wine that is handmade using traditional sustainable farming and vinification methods. It includes a blend of grapes from Muscadet and Touraine:53% Gamay, 33% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc, 4% Pineau d’Aunis and contains 12.5% alcohol. The amusing bottle holds 33.82 fluid ounces (a liter) rather than an actual forty ounces.

I often find rosé either too sweet or too tart. I like a balance somewhere in between. I don’t expect the fullness of a red, but I want some body to the wine. Forty Ounce Rosé fills the bill.

Rosés have been back in vogue for a few years, but in my city it can still be a struggle to find a satisfactory bottle. My friends and I recently resorted to having the liquor store order a case of Forty Ounce that we can split. Perhaps if we order often enough, they’ll opt to stock it on the shelf.
breton
Eventually, we get hungry while sitting on the porch. This week I decided to add Breton Original gluten-free crackers to my snack choices. I must confess, it’s been so long since I’ve had the original crackers containing gluten, I can’t remember what they taste like so I can’t give you that comparison. I’ll just have to describe my current experience.

The initial taste is slightly sweet and not unpleasant. The texture is not crisp and crunchy like Schär Table Crackers or crisp then somewhat flaky like Glutino Premium Rounds. These are softer with a texture similar to that of a graham cracker. At the end of the bite, there’s an aftertaste I don’t like. I’m not sure if it comes from the flax seeds or added flavoring.

I tried these crackers alongside chicken salad and tuna salad. This is not the cracker I would choose for either in the future. Perhaps I would serve Breton Original gluten-free crackers with a soft cheese.

It’s possible herbed chévre would mitigate the aftertaste. A smear of cream cheese topped with apricot jelly or olives might also work. Overall, I see these as a specialty cracker, not one to keep on hand.

In addition to snacks, porch sitting is often filled with fanciful contemplation. I’m sure the world’s problems have been solved several times over on porch stoops. Perhaps if conference rooms were filled with rustling leaves, beautiful blooms, a pleasant breeze, warbling birds, diverse and cordial neighbors in comfortable clothes, and plenty of wine meetings would inspire change and improvement in our institutions.

At least we know we can inspire change from our porches with Forty Ounce Rosé and Breton crackers in hand.

http://www.fortyouncewines.com/#wines

http://www.fortyouncewines.com/#wines/rosé

https://www.darefoods.com/ca_en/brand/breton/1

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/well-preserved/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”