Posts tagged ‘Celiac Disease’

August 28, 2017

Is It Safe to Graze on These Snacks?

If you must be gluten-free to be healthy, you always have to ask: Is it safe to graze on this? In order to answer that question, I always start with the label. I recently purchased a Graze Dark Chocolate Cherry Tart snack. I was in a hurry, so I saved the label reading for later.
graze
I liked the natural looking package and I absolutely LOVE dried cherries, almonds, and chocolate. These are ingredients that can easily be gluten free and that I often use when I prepare dessert. The only noted allergens on the label are soybeans and tree nuts. Buying this didn’t seem like too big a risk.

When I got home and had time to read the label, I saw that the chocolate buttons include something called “cocoa mass”. I didn’t know exactly what cocoa mass was, but I recognized that it needed to be further investigated. I visited the Graze website.

After visiting the site, I still don’t know what cocoa mass is, but I found this statement located next to the list of ingredients:
“allergens
Graze is not suitable for people with allergies. All of our food is packed in the same place, so cross-contamination between any of our ingredients is possible. Our snacks may contain traces of gluten, eggs, peanuts, soya, milk, nuts, celery, mustard, fish and sesame.”

This statement appears next to the list of ingredients for each and every product on the website. It’s interesting to note that there’s not enough of some of these allergens to require a notation on the label, but there’s enough for the company to feel it necessary to note their possible presence in the product. I appreciate the fact that they’ve done so in a clear, visible manner.

Where does that leave you?

It’s always safest to err on the side of caution when you encounter an unknown ingredient. I also avoid products that say they are processed on the same equipment as wheat, rye, and barley or may contain trace amounts of these ingredients. If a label does not list any gluten containing ingredients, questionable items, or cross contamination possibilities, I trust that it’s okay to consume even though it may not be labeled gluten-free.
 
While I like the Graze story of 7 friends who quit their jobs to create better snacks, I cannot recommend these snacks to anyone who is gluten-free. On the other hand, if you’re not limited by the allergens, eat up!

Choose from mixes full of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, superfoods, veggies, and protein. The flavor combinations sound interesting and the packages are easy to carry. Graze has a subscription service, so you can have them delivered right to your door.

If you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, it’s not safe to graze on these snacks, but you don’t have to miss out on enjoying dried cherries, almonds and chocolate!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

https://www.graze.com/us/shop/dark-chocolate-cherry-tart?format=multipack#tab-ingredient-tab

August 15, 2017

Travel Tip #18 Push the Limits?

Travel Tip #18 Push the Limits is written with you in mind if you suffer from IBS, IBD, Crohn’s Disease, Celiac Disease or other conditions that may lead to a sudden need for bathroom facilities. I just got back from LA. During Sunday brunch I had a sudden reminder of how uncomfortable it can be to travel with a gastrointestinal condition. This travel tip deals with a subject that’s difficult to discuss in public.
cypress
If your guts are constantly in a knot and you can’t predict when diarrhea, gas, or pain may suddenly hit, it can be hard to imagine taking a long trip on an airplane or even in a car full of people. A fear of embarrassment or discomfort can lead to a gradual withdrawal from family outings and vacations.

Reluctance to disclose the real reason for resistance to certain situations often leads family and friends to misinterpret what’s happening. I mean who really wants to say, “I just can’t face the chance that I’ll poop myself during a 3-hour plane ride?” I don’t. It really doesn’t matter how close we are, I just don’t want to discuss that with you.

So, what should I do?

Pretend to be too busy, too sick, or too angry with Aunt Jane to attend?
Insist on a different trip that no one else is excited about?
Wear adult diapers?

Sometimes saying no may be the best choice. If your only motive is to take care of yourself, you’ve explored all the options that might make the journey enjoyable for you, and you still can’t find a way to make peace with attending, then say no. It’s only when you have an ulterior motive or when continual refusals begin to limit your access to a full life that saying no becomes detrimental.

Say yes within limits. If it’s hard for you to take care of yourself, establishing certain parameters in advance can make it easier to decide in the moment when presented with an invitation. For instance, you may want to have a rule that you only agree to car trips in areas with ample facilities. You may want to limit flights to 1 hour at certain times of the day. You could have a rule that you will not stay at friends’ houses so that you have the privacy of your own space. Along those lines, you can have a rule that you don’t share hotel rooms. If you know you usually have fewer problems an hour after eating, join the family after the meal rather than for the meal.
breakfast
Make sure you eat properly and/or take your medication on time. When you’re willing to say yes, there’s no reason to tempt fate. Adhering to the regimen that works best for you while varying your activity can make all the difference. Investing a little time in research and advance planning can make it possible for you to have plenty of medication on hand even when you miss a connection.
It can also mean that you have plenty of tummy friendly snacks on hand when meal times or restaurant options unexpectedly change.
orange tree
Focus on the good stuff. A beautiful view, a warm hug from your favorite cousin, or the smile on your grandson’s face when he meets LeBron James can all mitigate a little discomfort. After all, you may not feel perfectly well at home. If you can feel equally good and add some great memories, it may be worth risking possible inconvenience or embarrassment. If things turn out badly, you can make a different choice next time. If you always stop yourself before you start, you’ll miss out on a lot of good stuff.

Bring the party to you. If you need to be in your own space to be comfortable, make your home the place everyone gathers. Let the travel be someone else’s problem. Instead of missing out on memories and contact with people you enjoy, develop your hosting skills.

That doesn’t mean you have to do a lot of work and throw a party. Just establish that you’d like to see everyone at a certain time and invite, invite, invite. When someone visits, relax and enjoy them. It may take some time to develop momentum, but eventually word will spread that your place is the place to be. Making your guests feel welcome is all it really takes to be a great host.

If you suffer from IBS, IBD, Crohn’s Disease, or Celiac Disease, should you push the limits and travel or should you stay home? There’s no right or wrong answer. What’s right for today may not be right for tomorrow.

The important thing is to always, always take very good care of yourself. For some of us that is in and of itself pushing the limits.

June 14, 2017

Has Gluten-Free Living Gotten Easier?

Has gluten-free living gotten easier as awareness has increased? When I learned gluten-free living was a necessity for me, it took an average of 11 years to get a diagnosis of celiac disease, gluten-free products were limited and only available in specialty stores, and few restaurants offered gluten-free menus. That was 13 years ago. What has changed?
gf pie crust
Access to information has increased

Over the past decade, the internet and smart devices have increased our access to information exponentially. Want to know if the Knorr Vegetable Recipe Mix your friend used in the spinach dip she brought to a party is gluten-free? Just grab your phone and find out. Want to find gluten-free pizza nearby? A digital assistant can find it and give you driving directions. Need to make sure a restaurant choice will be easy for you? Preview the menu on the website. Interested in current research? Much of the information is just a click away. Want to find a gluten-free partner or friend? Try http://glutenfreesingles.com/. Advances in technology have brought the most changes by far.

Restaurants are more informed

The term gluten-free is now widely recognized. Chances are that the waiter at your favorite restaurant is familiar with the term. That restaurant may offer a separate gluten-free menu or have certain items designated gluten-friendly. Many national chains publish allergen information online.

Major supermarkets have gluten-free selections

You can now find a selection of gluten-free convenience food at every major supermarket. In fact, the top-selling breakfast cereal in the USA is gluten-free Honey Nut Cheerios. Other commonly stocked gluten-free labeled foods are crackers, pretzels, pasta, cake mix, flour blends, cookies, frozen pizza, and frozen waffles. Even convenience stores keep a selection of high protein gluten-free snacks on hand.

Specialty bakeries exist

wedding cakeDedicated gluten-free bakeries that eliminate the possibility of cross-contact with gluten containing ingredients now dot the country. Not only can you choose from cookies, brownies, cheesecake, pie, and doughnuts, beautifully decorated gluten-free wedding and birthday cakes are available in cities across the US. Many specialty bakeries also offer dairy-free, nut-free, and vegan options.

Gluten-free labeling now has a standard in the US

Prior to 2014, a gluten-free label didn’t necessarily mean the product was free of gluten because there was no labeling standard in place. As of August 5, 2014, FDA-regulated packaged foods bearing a gluten-free claim must meet the following requirements: the food either must be inherently gluten-free; or shall not contain an ingredient that is: 1) a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); 2) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or 3) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food. Also, any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food must be less than 20 ppm. This rule does not apply to USDA (meat, poultry, some egg products) or TTB (alcoholic beverages) regulated foods.

Testing for celiac disease has increased

Doctors are more likely to test for celiac disease now than they were in 2004. The average length of diagnosis from onset of symptoms currently ranges from 6 – 10 years in the US. New screening tests are in development that may increase test rates in the future.

Experimental treatment is being tested

Research at Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Australia has led to the development of Nexvan2®, a product that aims to retrain the immune system to tolerate gluten. This treatment is currently being studied in clinical trials led by ImmusanT of Cambridge, MA. A Phase 2 study is scheduled to begin this year. If you would like to participate in ImmusanT studies, visit http://www.immusant.com/patient-resources/learn-more.php.

Looks like quite a few things have changed for the better in the gluten-free world! On balance, there are still things that can be improved.

More information can lead to confusion

When the mountain looks overwhelming, it’s difficult to start climbing. The sheer volume of information available can sometimes make things seem more confusing and difficult. Determining whether sources are reliable, recipes have been tested before publication, or a gluten-free pizza crust is being topped and baked in a kitchen where flour fills the air still requires time and energy. Well-meaning friends may pass along incomplete or incorrect information obtained online. The ingredients list on a favorite product you previously researched may unexpectedly change. In real life, it’s never quite as simple as 1-2-3.

Your server may not really know what gluten-free means

While most waiters have now heard the term gluten-free, they may not have a clear understanding of what it means. This sometimes makes communication a bit more awkward. They may also have served people who jumped on the gluten-free bandwagon as a fad and who cheat whenever they want a piece of cake. This makes it harder for those of us who must be gluten-free to be taken seriously.

Gluten-free processed food is still processed food

There seems to be a never-ending parade of less than delightful, expensive products coming and going from store shelves. At one point, these were grouped together in sections marked gluten-free. Now, they’ve been reintegrated into the regular product shelves where they’re more difficult to locate. Some packaged convenience products taste good. Many do not. And even though they may be gluten-free, they’re still processed food.

It’s harder to find gluten-free lists

Now that there’s a labeling standard, some companies have stopped publishing lists of gluten-free products online and have substituted a “read the label” statement. This makes it harder to research things like acceptable Halloween candy in advance.

The rate of diagnosis still takes 6 – 10 years

While doctors may test for celiac more frequently, it can still take 10 years to receive a diagnosis and over 90% of those with the disease remain undiagnosed. That doesn’t feel like much progress. That means over 2.25 million in the US are living with a nearly 4-fold increased risk of death and do not know it.*

According to the Celiac Support Association:
Untreated celiac disease increases the risk of cancer 200-300%.
Untreated celiac disease increases the risk of miscarriage 800-900%.
66% of those with celiac disease have osteopenia or osteoporosis.
51.4% of those with celiac disease have neurologic disorders
Healthcare costs per untreated celiac in the US: $5,000 – $12,000 annually.
Total US healthcare cost for all untreated celiacs: $14.5 – $34.8 billion annually.

BD PartyAnd if you really want to experience how little things have changed…
Visit a few weddings, baby showers, football watching parties, funeral luncheons, law school receptions, fundraising events, committee meetings, festivals, coffee houses, concession stands, hotel breakfast buffets, and neighborhood potlucks. While there are now some exceptions, the pre-eat or carry your own food rule still frequently applies. Ingredient information is not typically available in these settings and options are often limited.

Progress has been made

Things have gotten easier on many fronts. I am grateful for those. When I discover things that have become more difficult, I feel frustrated, but I stay the course because it’s worth it to me to feel good. And all things considered, living gluten-free is not that difficult. It simply requires commitment and planning.

Is a gluten-free lifestyle worth it

Yes!!!! Even if nothing had changed in the past 13 years, living a gluten-free lifestyle is absolutely worth any inconvenience for me. Having a chance to feel my best and be my healthiest is always worth it because how I feel affects my quality of life every minute of every day. Being my healthiest also makes it possible for me to potentially enjoy more years of living a full life. I can’t think of any reason I wouldn’t want that.

https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Allergens/ucm362880.htm
https://www.beyondceliac.org/celiac-disease/facts-and-figures/
https://www.csaceliacs.org/diagnosis_of_celiac_disease_fact_sheet.jsp
https://www.wehi.edu.au/research-diseases/immune-disorders/coeliac-disease
http://www.immusant.com/patient-resources/clinical-trials.php
http://lilacpatisserie.com/wedding-cakes
http://www.dempseybakery.com/
https://www.tu-lusbakery.com/menus/picture-gallery/
*http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001650850900523X

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

July 18, 2016

Dehydration Can Increase Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Joint Pain

treeDehydration can increase gastrointestinal symptoms and joint pain. Today it’s 97º with a heat index of 105º. I’ve been without power for the past 4 days since a tree took down my electric lines in a storm. The air is back on now, but it still feels hot in my house. Even minor activity like wiping out the refrigerator I had emptied early in the outage causes me to break a sweat…inside…in the air conditioning. I keep drinking water, but I feel like I can’t get ahead.

With the constant heat and humidity, it’s a continual battle here to drink enough water in the summer. If you’re not careful, it’s easy to become dehydrated. And for someone like me who has digestive issues, dehydration can make them worse.

One of the early warning signs of dehydration is pain ranging from heartburn to gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD). If you have Celiac Disease or are gluten intolerant, this pain can be mistaken for a response to an accidental gluten ingestion.

Another indicator is joint pain. The cartilage in your joints is composed mainly of water and, lacking blood vessels, is dependent on water to deliver the nutrients required for maintenance and repair. Dehydration contributes to abrasive damage that happens when cartilage surfaces glide over each other when you bend your arms or knees. Since the inflammation experienced by those of us who suffer from autoimmune disorders often experience joint pain, this too can be mistaken for a problem other than dehydration.

If you feel extra tired or depressed, it can be a reflection of a lack of sufficient hydration. All I wanted to do this afternoon was sleep. I’m certain this was a result of all the hours I’ve spent in extreme heat the past few days without managing to drink as much water as needed. I have functioned through sheer force of will which is absolutely not the healthiest way to function.

When I get too hot, I don’t notice that I feel hungry or thirsty. Sometimes, I have to stop what I’m doing and eat something salty to trick myself into drinking more water.
water
So, how much water is enough?

Of course there’s no easy answer. It depends on size, weight, environment, and activity level. Some experts recommend between one-half and one ounce of water for each pound you weigh every day. That’s 9.375 eight ounce glasses per day on the low end and 18.75 eight ounce glasses or 2.34 gallons per day on the high end for a 150 lb person. Hardly any of us drink 2.3 gallons of water each day!

If you notice that your urine is dark, you have a headache, you’re overly tired or experience the other symptoms mentioned above, increase your water intake and see if the symptoms improve.

Also keep in mind that many fruits or vegetables contain a significant amount of water and are refreshing when served chilled. Watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, pineapple, raspberries, grapes, cucumbers, zucchini, and spinach are all high in water content. A chilled wedge salad or a cup of gazpacho can fill you up and hydrate you at the same time.

As summer moves toward its peak, we’ll all have plenty of opportunity to be reminded to hydrate. For those of us who struggle with gastrointestinal or joint pain, a little extra water may bring us some unexpected relief.

Bottoms up!

https://www.healthambition.com/how-much-water-do-you-need-daily/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256

http://nutritioninfo.tripod.com/id19.html