Posts tagged ‘brunch egg recipe’

July 1, 2019

Eggcetera, Eggcetera, Eggcetera

Eggs are so versatile, you can make them part of breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack or picnic, eggcetera, eggcetera, eggcetera. High in protein, low in carbs and full of essential amino acids, vitamins, and minerals, eggs are an almost perfect food.

The concern that consuming eggs will raise blood cholesterol was diminished by studies a few years ago only to be resurrected this year. Perhaps that will mean you don’t want to eat eggs for every meal or even every day, but eating the occasional egg as part of a balanced, healthy diet leaves the risk factor most likely low.
quiche
If you were going to fill a day with eggs, you could begin with a breakfast of scrambled, fried, poached, or soft boiled eggs. Eggs Benedict, biscuits filled with eggs and sausage, and easily customized omelets along with French toast are longstanding favorites.

In my family, there’s a lot of enthusiasm for breakfast tacos. Scrambled eggs, cheese, and bacon topped with hot sauce and folded into a corn tortilla does make a filling and delicious combination. Alternatively, a gluten-free, dairy-free pancake filled with scrambled eggs, bacon, and a tiny bit of strawberry jelly makes a great dairy-free alternative taco.

That brings me to non-dairy scrambled eggs. When my oldest son was two, we discovered that giving him dairy resulted in significant congestion and irritability. My second son was so allergic I could not consume dairy when I was breastfeeding him without also medicating him. After a couple of days on medication that kept him awake, I opted for no dairy.

During that first phase without dairy, I began substituting water for milk in scrambled eggs. I discovered I preferred the fluffier result so I never reverted to the traditional addition of milk. Last year, I ran across a POPSUGAR post on the secret ingredient for fluffy scrambled eggs. They got it right – water!

If you’re not up early enough for breakfast, you can always have eggs for brunch. My mom had a recipe called Brunch Eggs. It’s a great option for special occasion brunches because you can make it in advance then bake just before serving. Here’s the recipe:

Brunch Eggs

8 slices white bread, crust removed
Butter, softened
5 eggs
1 pint half & half
Salt to taste
8 oz grated Old English cheese (can substitute a mixture of sharp & mild cheddar)

Preheat oven to 325. Spray 8 x 10 oven-safe baking dish with olive oil spray.

Butter each slice of bread on both sides. Tear into bite-size pieces and place in prepared dish.

In large bowl, whisk 5 eggs. Whisk in half & half. Add salt to taste and stir. Pour mixture over bread. Sprinkle cheese over the top. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight.

Bake at 325 for 45 minutes. Serve hot.

This recipe is easily made gluten-free by substituting gluten-free bread. It will take a little more determination and experimentation to make it dairy-free. There are many milk substitutes, but some work better than others when heated or as part of a specific flavor profile. Non-dairy cheeses also vary widely in flavor and meltability.

For lunch, I like egg salad. I make several different versions. Choosing one depends on the day and ingredients available. They’re all good on bread, crackers, or wrapped in lettuce. My other most common lunch egg option is tuna salad with boiled eggs included.

At snack time, I most often choose deviled eggs. I make a traditional mayo/mustard version unless I’m feeling fancy, then I upgrade to bleu cheese with tarragon. My mother made deviled eggs with butter, vinegar, salt & pepper.

When I’m flying, a boiled egg is my preferred snack. Because of the unpredictable timing of stops and availability of gluten-free food, I always want to have something on hand. A peeled, boiled egg is easy to carry through an airport and on a plane. If you prefer, pickled eggs would work as well.

At dinner time, I love a fritatta. I can fill it with leftover or newly sautéed vegetables; bacon, sausage, or salami; and cheese or cream cheese. Since there’s no crust, I don’t have to worry about creating a gluten-free version. If you prefer crust on your egg pies, you can always opt for quiche.

Eggs don’t have to be the main feature of the meal. Served atop steamed asparagus with a sprinkle of parmesan or as the crown on bibimbop, they bring a delightful finishing touch.

A day filled with eggs won’t leave you lacking for dessert. Custard or custard pie, meringue, soufflé, bread pudding, creme brûlée, cheesecake, and ice cream contain significant amounts of egg. Other desserts use eggs as a binder–cake, cookies, brownies, cream pies, and pudding.

It takes more than one day to exhaust the many ways you can prepare those little jewels with 70 calories, 6 grams of protein, 1 gram of carbohydrate, and 65 mg of sodium plus all 9 essential amino acids that cannot be made by your body in addition to iron, vitamins A,D,E, & B12, folate, selenium, lutein, zeaxanthin, and choline. The amount of nutrition packed in such a small package is impressive, but the usefulness of eggs doesn’t stop there.

Eggs bring the element of fun to Easter. They can be blown out of their shells to boggle the minds of children. The yolks can serve as the binder for tempera paint. Eggcetera, eggcetera, eggcetera.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6024687/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30874756

https://www.sciencemediacentre.org/expert-reaction-to-study-looking-at-eggs-cholesterol-and-heart-disease/

https://www.popsugar.com/food/Scrambled-Eggs-Water-43048421

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/get-know-breakfast-foods/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/easiest-egg-salad-ever/
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