Archive for ‘Get to Know Your Food’

October 22, 2018

Allergen Free Halloween Treats You Can Share With The Class

If you’re looking for allergen free Halloween Treats you can share with your child’s class, we have a few for you to consider. It can be hard to find treats that are free of all the major allergens, but when it comes to sharing with classmates, you don’t want anyone to be left out. Luckily, this year there are some fun options available!

Sweets Indeed has packaged various forms of candy in vials with Halloween themed names. The vials come in packs of 12. Some are a mixture of liquid and pellet candies. Some have crystals and powder. All of them look like great fun!

At this moment, it’s less expensive to purchase these items from Amazon than it is direct from Sweets. A 12 pack is $14.95 on Amazon and $19.95 from Sweets.
blood
Blood Sweet Candy

The Blood Sweet Candy set includes 6 vials of Blood Sample Sour Cherry Liquid Candy and 6 vials of Blood Clots Wild Cherry Candy Pebbles

The vials look gruesome and gross just like kids prefer! With sugar, corn syrup, and fructose as the main ingredients, I won’t say these are healthy treats, but few Halloween treats are.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Liquid Candy: Corn Syrup, Fructose, Water, Sugar, Malic Acid, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/bloody-sweet-candy-12-pack

monster
Monster Fun Candy

The Monster Fun set is comprised of 2 vials of Vampire Blood Black Cherry Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Monster Slime Green Apple Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Witches Potion Grape Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Jack’s Ashes Orange Candy Powder, 2 vials of Devil Dust Strawberry Candy Powder, and 2 vials of Werewolf Dandruff Root Beer Candy Powder.

Ingredients
Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

Liquid Candy: Corn Syrup, Fructose, Water, Sugar, Malic Acid, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/monster-fun-candy-12-pack

Ghost
Ghost Fun Candy

If you choose Ghost Fun, you’ll get 6 vials of Ghost Toot Dust Vanilla Candy Powder plus 6 vials of Ghost Boogers Vanilla Candy Pebbles.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/ghost-fun-candy-12-pack

undeadZombie Fun Candy

Can candy be undead? I guess it can. Order Zombie Fun and get 6 vials of Zombie Toot Dust Sour Apple Candy Powder and 6 vials of Zombie Boogers Green Apple Candy Powder.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/zombie-fun-candy-12-pack

unicorn
Unicorn Boogers

What kid hasn’t eaten boogers? Now it can be a parent sanctioned activity! Unicorn Boogers include Fruity Candy Pebbles along with Sugar Crystals. The candy pebbles flavors are key lime, lemonade, watermelon, wild berry, tangerine and blue raspberry. Then there are glimmer white sugar crystals. Apparently Boogers come at a premium. They’re $21.95 for 12 vials from either Sweets or Amazon.

Ingredients
Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/unicorn-boogers-8-pack

Zombie Bawlz

Your treats don’t have to come in vials. Zombie Bawlz Chewy Fruit Sours come in a bag filled with Cherry, Watermelon and Green Apple chewy flavors. They’re $10 per bag from Sweets. On Amazon, you can get two bags for that amount of money.

Ingredients
Corn Syrup, Sugar, Dextrose, Malic Acid, Citric Acid, Modified Corn Starch, Sodium Citrate, Carnuba Wax, Bees Wax, Confectioner’s Glaze, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Caramel Color, Yellow #5, Yellow #6 Lake, Red #40, Red #40 Lake, Blue #1, Blue #2 Lake

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/zombie-bawlz

If none of these treats appeal to you, Sixlets® offers 3 flavors of gluten-free, nut-free, kosher candies that contain no artificial colors or sweeteners. It should be noted that these candies do contain milk and soy.

A box of 72 tubes can be purchased from Amazon for $13.07 and is eligible for Prime shipping. Each tube has 23 calories. Choose from Original Sixlets Chocolatey Candies, Chewy Sixlets Fruity Flavored Candies, and Fruity Sixlets Chocolatey Candies.

The original flavor features a chocolatey center containing cocoa and carob and a crunchy candy coating. Chewy Sixlets Fruity Flavored Candies come in Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Blue Raspberry, and Green Apple. You can enjoy Fruity Sixlets Chocolatey Candies in Blueberry, Strawberry, Raspberry, Banana, Orange flavor.

https://sixlets.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw6rXeBRD3ARIsAD9ni9AQfHbJuL0jMrH1pPCZ4aeIMDxXnpGtY0N95QZE2CMVhoggoFGW0QwaAgSnEALw_wcB

With Halloween more than a week away, there’s plenty of time to get your treats ordered and delivered in time. Choosing treats with fewer allergens is a thoughtful and kind gesture for you to make to your child’s allergic classmates.

Happy Halloween!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/halloween-treats-dont-candy/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/trick-or-treat/

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July 31, 2018

Eating Her Curds and Whey

spiderSpiders may not be the current danger for Little Miss Muffet when she eats her curds and whey. Last week, several snack cracker recalls centered around possible salmonella contamination of the ingredient whey. If you’re familiar with the nursery rhyme, you probably instinctively associate whey with milk or milk products, but what exactly is it?

Whey is the liquid that remains after you strain curdled milk. In food manufacturing, it is a byproduct of making cheese. Cheddar and Swiss cheeses leave sweet whey and cottage cheese and yogurt leave acid or sour whey.

When cheese was made at home, the remaining whey could be substituted for milk in baking. Even now, I sometimes use the liquid from yogurt in baked goods. Whey was also consumed as a beverage with honey and alcohol.

In US commercial food manufacturing, whey was a waste product dumped into rivers until the US government prohibited such dumping. Faced with a disposal problem, manufacturers began to look for other ways to use it. They first developed a filler for ice cream.

hawaiianWhey’s use as a filler in convenience foods grew from there. It is now found in products that may or may not have inhabited my snack bin – things like King’s Hawaiian Bread, Cheetos, Ritz Sandwich Crackers, Goldfish Crackers, Nature Valley Protein Bars, Luna Protein Bars, Oatmega Protein Bars, Swiss Rolls, and Similac Pro-Advance Infant Formula. Whey has also become a nutritional supplement popular with bodybuilders because of its leucine content.

The primary components of whey are water, lactose, protein, fat, and amino acids. The proteins include beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, lactoferrin, and immunoglobulins.

Three types of whey protein are produced in the food industry – Whey Protein Concentrate, Whey Protein Isolate, and Hydrolyzed Whey Protein. In theory, whey protein isolate can be safely consumed if you have lactose intolerance, but other forms of whey protein may cause symptoms.

Like most milk in the grocery store, the whey contained in convenience foods is typically pasteurized to make it less likely to harbor bacteria and safer to consume. Unfortunately, as we have recently seen, it can still become contaminated during manufacturing or packaging.

It’s no secret that I prefer fresh food prepared at home. I think it tastes better, and I feel better knowing what’s in the food. Of course that doesn’t mean that all my food will be free from a risk of salmonella, listeria, E. coli, or other contaminants.

And real life means that I sometimes reach for convenience foods. Of course, I read the labels. I have to make sure they’re free of gluten and shrimp. Right now, I’m making sure they’re free of whey.

https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/

http://wheyproteininstitute.org/facts/howwheyismade/wheyproteincomponents

http://www.liquidirish.com/2012/05/whey-alcohol.html

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/whey-protein-101#what-is-it

https://www.ampi.com/home/page/130

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

May 8, 2018

It’s Strawberry Season, Now What’s a Shortcake?

It’s strawberry season, now what’s a shortcake?

The farmers market in my neighborhood just opened for the season with a strawberry festival. I love strawberries! As a child, I picked tiny wild ones from my great aunt’s yard. Now I enjoy medium sized locally grown or gigantic shipped-in berries. My favorite way to eat them is right off the stem, but strawberry shortcake makes me happy as well.
strawberries
My grandmother and mother called traditional pie crust sprinkled with sugar shortcake. Thin, flaky, and crisp, it played well against partially mashed, sweetened strawberries and whipped cream. There’s a restaurant in my area that serves this style of shortcake two layers tall. It is divine!

I can’t say crust-based strawberry shortcake is widely known. My grandmother’s house, my mother’s house, and that one restaurant are the only places I’ve eaten it. I suppose in the strictest sense, sweetened crust fits one of the original requirements of shortcake in that it contains fat that has been cut into the flour. The only problem is that it’s not really a cake.

But is shortcake really cake or is it a scone or biscuit? The first recipe for shortcake appeared in an English cookbook in 1588, but I don’t know what it said. That makes it difficult to determine exactly what sort of crumb it had.

A quick scroll through several culinary guides failed to find mention of shortcake. Shortbread is often included, but not shortcake. Perhaps that’s because there are too many versions to narrow down a definition. Or perhaps it’s because perfectly ripened strawberries sweetened and topped with whipped cream are so good they don’t really need any sort of biscuit, cake, or crust. Anything that absorbs and delivers that scrumptious juice will be appreciated and well received.

When shortcake is mentioned in culinary articles, it is often differentiated from sponge cake. This is sort of amusing because I’ve probably been served strawberry shortcake made with sponge cake more often than any other kind.

So what’s a shortcake? Whatever vehicle you prefer to deliver sweetened strawberries and whipped cream. Most of us probably gravitate to the version of shortcake that is most familiar. I prefer pie crust to squishy cake. I’ll take a sweetened biscuit in a pinch. You may prefer a butter-rich cake or corn muffin.

Whatever you place it on, a combination of fresh strawberries and cream sweetened or not, whipped or not, will provide a delicious summer treat!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortcake
http://bakingbites.com/2009/09/what-is-a-shortcake/
http://www.cookthink.com/reference/1990/What_is_shortcake

March 20, 2018

Why Did Your Grandma Make Chicken Soup?

Why did your grandma make chicken soup? Well, she may not have. She may have bought it in a can, but I bet she served you some when you felt under the weather. It’s what grandmas do. Even moms do it. And the good news is, chicken soup really does help you recover from a cold.
soup
Of course, these days grandma may make chicken soup when the grandkids come for a visit because she knows she’ll be needing some. Kids are collectors of viruses that they’re happy to share.

I think DJ recently fed me a poison peach. He had a bite on his fork. He held it out. I leaned in close to say, “Nummy nummy num” and pretend to eat it. With perfect timing as I pursed my lips, he shoved the bite in my mouth. Stupid kid germs! Now I have a really bad cold. I need chicken soup!

So what makes chicken soup good for you when you have a cold?

First, it contains the protein building block carnosine. Carnosine is produced naturally by the body and is important for proper function of the heart, brain, liver, and kidneys. Giving your body an extra boost of this dipeptide molecule may help reduce some stress on the body while it’s fighting a virus. Both homemade soup and store-bought soup contain carnosine.

Some research indicates that chicken soup may slow the gathering of white cells in the lungs in response to a virus. This may help reduce the coughing, sneezing, and stuffy nose symptoms that make a cold so miserable.

Homemade chicken soup can be nutrient rich from the chicken and vegetables you choose to include. Carrots add beta-carotene. Celery adds vitamin C. Onions add antioxidants. Button mushrooms add B vitamins, riboflavin, and niacin. Chicken adds protein. These nutrients support your immune system and give your cells fuel to rebuild.

Chicken soup is often fairly salty. The salt helps carry bacteria away from the mouth, throat, and tonsils much like a saltwater gargle.

Get plenty of fluids is the most common advice given to anyone recovering from a cold. If you have a fever, fluids are especially important to prevent dehydration. They also help flush the body. Consuming chicken soup automatically adds fluids to your daily intake.

The warmth of chicken soup soothes a sore throat. The steam helps cleanse the sinuses. The added touch of grandma’s soothing tones when she serves you warms your soul. Or so they say.

Chicken soup may have been a comforting, loving tradition long before we could scientifically prove it had healing properties. That didn’t make it any less effective. Somehow, we know that comforting, loving traditions have mysterious healing properties.

https://healthybutsmart.com/carnosine/

https://share.upmc.com/2014/12/health-benefits-chicken-noodle-soup/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/good-day-chicken-soup/