Archive for ‘Dietary Compliance’

November 5, 2018

I Can’t Wait for Grocery Delivery!

I can’t wait for grocery delivery! Creating and testing gluten-free recipes means I can never shop at just one store. I’d rather spend my time in the kitchen than traveling to and from the grocery or walking through the aisles. Building a favorites list online will allow me to spend a minimum amount of time shopping and get all of the basics delivered right to my door. I love that idea!
carts
In preparation for the eventuality of grocery delivery, I’ve been clicking and picking up. My primary concern before I began was the quality of produce. Even when I do the shopping, it’s frequently difficult to find high quality, fresh produce in our local stores. Nonetheless, I decided to dive in.

Of course I can have nonperishables shipped from Amazon any time. I’ve previously purchased things like paper towels and G.H. Cretors popcorn from them. I didn’t enjoy the experience of having to fill a pantry box in order to get free shipping. I hated the way the items were packaged when they arrived. And I had to make sure someone was available to check my porch so the boxes didn’t disappear. That’s not the experience I’m looking for.

Subscriptions work well for some items like coffee. In fact, Jim’s Organic just started a subscription service. I signed up the minute I got an email announcing subscription availability. But coffee is something on which I can easily gauge my usage. I’m not as methodical about my consumption of paper towels or cereal.

In my market, there are two stores that offer click and pick-up service – Kroger and Wal-Mart. I chose Wal-Mart because they have a plan for $10 delivery in the near future. Each time I order from the site, I build familiarity with the product selection and add to my favorites list.

Downloading the app means I don’t have to call upon arrival. Once I receive a notice that the order is ready, I check in from my phone when I’m on the way. When I arrive, the store is notified and brings out the order.

This means that I’m allowing the app to track my location. This can be a privacy concern. If so, there’s an option to receive notification via email, drive to the store location, and call the number listed on a sign found in each parking spot in the pick-up area.
produce
Last week I added sugar snap peas to a pickup order. That evening, I popped the package open, washed a few and ate them raw. I was pleasantly surprised! The peas were crunchy, tender, and sweet. They were the freshest, tastiest produce I’ve had all year. That worry I had about the quality of produce is beginning to wane.

I’m attending a film festival out of town. There’s nothing in my refrigerator at home besides butter, jelly, and pickle relish. This week will be the perfect time to add more produce to an order and see if the peas were a fluke. I hope not. A pattern of reliably fresh produce and the deal will be sealed! Online grocery shopping will become a regular thing for me.

When grocery delivery begins…score!!! I really can’t wait!

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/what-makes-a-grocery-store-great/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

October 8, 2018

New Studies on the Health Benefits of Alcohol are Making Me Want a Drink

Two new studies indicate that alcohol consumption may not have as many (or any) health benefits as research previously indicated; these studies are making me want a drink! Try to figure out the health benefits or harm of consuming coffee, fat, carbohydrates, chocolate, or even bananas can be confusing at best. Now that they’re messing with happy hour, I think I’ll mull over the evidence drink in hand.

I’m not here to defend alcohol consumption. Alcohol has had devastating effects in my family. My grandfather drunkenly stumbled on the concrete front steps of his house, fell, hit his head, and eventually died from his injuries. The psychological effects of his drinking left my dad angry and violent. I understand on a visceral level that the detrimental effects of alcohol may not be quantifiable without including their contribution to psychological and physical trauma within families.

I’m not here to rail against alcohol consumption either. I know there are many people who have a drink occasionally or regularly and that’s it. They don’t overdo, drink and drive, or engage in other high-risk behaviors. Some of these people are genetically predisposed to alcoholism and yet they never develop the disease.

barrelsLike other dietary decisions, drinking alcohol is a lifestyle choice fraught with religious prohibitions, social implications, and conflicting evidence regarding health benefits. The path to making the best choice in such a situation is to have clear intentions, be informed, tell yourself the truth, own your choice, and give yourself permission to change your mind.

The older I get, the less it suffices to wait for someday to fully enjoy life. It is increasingly important to me to have a few moments each day that are pure pleasure. These moments don’t have to be big or monumental, but I intend to lean into them.

Last weekend, one of those moments was tasting a delicious coffee liqueur at the end of an impromptu distillery tour with friends. If I made a blanket prohibition against consuming alcohol, I would have missed that moment.

I chose to embrace it knowing there was no health benefit, but also knowing that I do not suffer from alcoholism. I am happy with that choice. If in a month I find myself spiking my coffee or milk with liqueur every morning, it may be deliciously pleasurable, but it will also be time to reconsider my choice.

There are so many pieces of life over which we have no control that we can feel quite powerless at times. It is easy to get lost in that feeling. Making deliberate choices to improve the quality of life in small, consistent ways can greatly increase a feeling of purpose and well-being which in turn can improve our health.

Each of us will have a unique path to wholeness, happiness, and health. Each of us will find obstacles on that path, naysayers who discourage us, cheerleaders who encourage us, and examples that inspire us. We will find pleasure and comfort in different ways.

I cannot say what the journey should look like for you. I do know that intention and practice can propel each of us toward becoming our best selves while enjoying life fully. Sometimes for me, that means watching the sunset while sipping a Hendrick’s and soda garnished with a cucumber.

Here’s to you loving the path you’re on!

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)31310-2/fulltext

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/15300277

https://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/body/news/a45281/bananas-bad-breakfast/

https://zenhabits.net/wholeness/


Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

ad

October 2, 2018

Looking Down the Road at Potential Celiac Disease Treatment, Will You be an Early Adopter?

Looking down the road at potential Celiac Disease treatment, will you be an early adopter? It may seem too soon to consider, but it’s possible that in 5 years there will be multiple pharmaceutical treatments or vaccines for Celiac Disease on the market. By the time they are FDA approved, they will have been through clinical trials involving human study participants that indicate the drugs are relatively safe and will most likely work. Once the drugs are approved, will you run to your doctor to request a new treatment, or will you take a wait and see approach?

Some of us love to be on the cutting edge of everything – fashion, interior design, automotive design, technology, everything. Some of us are even willing to pay dearly for the privilege. One of my graphic designer friends bought an Apple Lisa back in the day. He paid about $10,000 for it although he’ll tell you it was about $20,000. That’s $10,000 for a computer with 5MB (not GB) of hard drive space and a 5MHz processor. I regularly email photos that are 10MB.

This friend continued to buy a MAC immediately when a new model appeared. Then he’d scream often as he zapped the PRAM or held the shift key to disable extensions when he was trying to get the buggy system to boot. He’s followed the same pattern with iPhones. When it comes to technology, he understands he’ll pay more and experience less system stability as an early adopter and that’s okay with him.

I tend to wait a bit longer. I’m not on the tail end of adopting innovation, but I like to give companies a chance to work out a few of the bugs before I jump in with both feet. The internet has made it easy to monitor MAC computer system bug fixes. Armed with that information and knowledge of the nature of the bugs, I buy a bit later than my friend. I feel like I experience less downtime, less frustration, and less expense that way.
periodic
When it comes to pharmaceuticals, there’s a whole other level for early adopters to consider – long-term health effects. We often assume that the long-term effects of drugs have been studied before a drug goes to market. That’s not necessarily true. In fact, the more effective a drug is in clinical trials, the less true it may be.

If a drug or vaccine is extremely effective in producing a good outcome, a clinical trial may be ended early. This can mean some side-effects or long-term complications may not show up until after the drug receives approval and is prescribed to patients. There can be a lag in gathering and disseminating information regarding those complications to patients and physicians. The level of risk this presents for patients depends on the specific drug or vaccine.

The FDA website in describing the process of approving drugs states:
“Even though clinical trials provide important information on a drug’s efficacy and safety, it is impossible to have complete information about the safety of a drug at the time of approval. Despite the rigorous steps in the process of drug development, limitations exist. Therefore, the true picture of a product’s safety actually evolves over the months and even years that make up a product’s lifetime in the marketplace. FDA reviews reports of problems with prescription and over-the-counter drugs, and can decide to add cautions to the dosage or usage information, as well as other measures for more serious issues.”

If you’ve watched any network TV recently, you may have seen ads for lawyers representing patients who have received the shingles vaccine Zostavax. Various lawsuits allege the vaccine causes both loss of eyesight and, ironically, shingles. Class action lawsuits have also been filed on behalf of patients who allege they were harmed by drugs including Abilify, Ambien, Avandia, Baycol, Celebrex, Chantix, Crestor, Fosamax, Invokana, Januvia, Lamisil, Lexapro, Lipitor, Pradaxa, Prozac, Ritalin, Serevent, Tekturna, Xarelto, and Zyprexa.

Each of us has to weigh the potential risks and benefits of a recommended medication. If you have life-threatening bacterial pneumonia, the risk of refusing antibiotics most likely outweighs the benefits. If you have prediabetes, the possible risk to your long-term health from medication may not outweigh the benefit of reducing the possibility that you may develop a disease that you may not develop anyway.

With all of that in mind, let’s take a look at the drugs that are being explored for the treatment of Celiac Disease:

BL-7010
An Israeli company owns the rights to a non-absorbable polymer that binds gliadin in the gut and prevents the formation of peptides that trigger an autoimmune response. The drug is not absorbed into the blood and is excreted along with protein from the gut. BL-7010 drug has made it through a Phase 2 clinical trial.

Egg Yolk Therapy
The theory here is that antibodies in the yolk of chicken eggs neutralize gluten allowing people with Celiac Disease to include a little gluten in their diet without suffering symptoms. This therapy would be used alongside a gluten-free diet. It is not believed to be a potential cure.

Larazotide Acetate
Larazotide acetate is an oral peptide that reduces leakiness in the intestines so that gluten doesn’t cross the intestinal barrier and trigger an autoimmune response. It would not eliminate the need for a gluten-free diet, but could lessen the effects of accidental gluten ingestion. Phase 3 clinical trials are being conducted this year.

Latiglutenase
Latiglutenase is a combination of enzymes that was hoped to break down gluten so that damaged intestines could heal. In a Phase 2 clinical trial, participants receiving latiglutenase improved, but so did those receiving a placebo.

The data have now been re-analyzed and scientists believe that latiglutenase may help relieve the symptoms of Celiac patients who are following a gluten-free diet, but still experience discomfort and pain. Last year, the NIH extended a grant for a two-year blind study of latiglutenase. This research will focus on symptom reduction.

Saliva Rothia
There is an enzyme that pulverizes gluten found within a bacterium called Rothia in saliva. Using knowledge of Rothia’s enzyme, researchers found that another bacterium, B. subtilis, produces an enzyme similar to Rothia. Recent research proves that modified subtilisin enzymes adhere to and detoxify gluten in mice. A big plus is that B. subtilis is safely consumed in Japan in the fermented soybean dish natto, making food-based delivery a possibility.

TIMP-Gliadin
TIMP-Gliadin is a compound composed of the protein particle and Toleragenic Immune Modifying nanoParticles. It sounds like the nanoParticles may alter the body’s immune response to gluten, but I can’t be sure. It’s too early to know much about this research.

Nexvax2
This vaccine works much like allergy shots in that a patient develops gluten tolerance through a series of injections. $40 million in funding has been secured for future research and the vaccine will enter Phase 2 clinical trials. The goal of this vaccine is to eventually eliminate the need for a gluten-free diet.

As you can see, the goal of many of these drugs is to reduce or eliminate the effects of accidental gluten ingestion. They would not eliminate the need for a gluten-free diet. Nervax2, BL-7010, and TIMP-Gliadin could possibly achieve the loftier goal of allowing those with Celiac Disease to consume gluten without damaging their intestines.

With these treatments on the horizon, now is a great time to explore whether you are an early adopter, a wait and see type, or someone who is content following a gluten-free diet. The gluten-free diet remains an effective treatment for Celiac Disease as long as you are compliant, so there’s really no wrong answer here. It’s all up to you, your preferences, and your goals!

Waaait, does that make this decision easier or harder? Probably depends on whether you’re an early adopter. I think I’ll wait and see…

https://www.macstories.net/mac/the-lisa/

http://info.cmsri.org/the-driven-researcher-blog/merck-admits-shingles-vaccine-can-cause-eye-damage-and-shingles

https://www.thejusticelawyer.com/practice-areas/detail/dangerous-drugs-medical-devices-list/

http://www.immusant.com/clinical-development/celiac-disease-programs.php

https://www.allergicliving.com/2018/03/14/inside-the-race-for-a-celiac-disease-treatment/

https://www.fda.gov/ForPatients/Approvals/Drugs/ucm405579.htm

https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-drugs-in-development-562289

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

July 24, 2018

Speed Kills

Remember the ad campaign, Speed Kills? I can’t remember if I first heard the term in an anti-drug campaign or an attempt to reduce speed limits. The phrase has been used for both. This week, I’m thinking of Speed Kills in totally different terms.

Last weekend I went to see Won’t You Be My Neighbor. This movie chronicles the career of Fred Rogers, the creator of MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD. There was nothing speedy about Mister Rogers. His slow pace stands in stark contrast to other children’s entertainers. This was deliberate. It was also significant.

Mister Rogers understood that very important things happen when we’re still and quiet. He included long pauses and silence in his television program. This is considered a no-no in the TV world, but as someone observed in the movie, there were many times when nothing much was going on, but none of the time was wasted.

On some level, parents and children must have sensed the significance of this. They certainly responded. Mister Rogers became hugely successful in spite of doing everything “wrong” for a television audience.

In my home, I observed that when my boys watched MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD their behavior was markedly different than when they watched He-Man. He-Man led to an afternoon of hitting each other, breaking toys, and generally violent behavior.

MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD, on the other hand, had a calming effect. After watching, the boys were kinder, gentler, and quieter. They played together instead of fighting. My house was infinitely more peaceful.

At the time, I didn’t take time to analyze why this was true, I just did the practical thing and banned He-Man. If I needed the kids to have screen time so that I could clean up the kitchen or do the laundry, we opted for MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD or the video disc Free to be You and Me.

Now, with much more experience under my belt including many years of working long hours, never missing an event, frequent travel, work-work-work-play-play-play and rarely saying no, I understand the importance of being still. Being present requires taking pauses to notice what has happened and how it makes us feel.

I know you may read that and say, “duh,” but look at how we live. We rarely pause between activities, much less during them. We fill our waking hours with movement, noise, and electronic distraction.

One of my grandchildren has 4 structured activity classes per week – he’s 9 months old! Will he be able to lie on his back, stare at the clouds smelling fresh-cut grass and feeling the solidness of the ground supporting him when he’s three or will he be lost without constant activity?

It seems we have some level of awareness that we need to increase our sense of well-being. Ways to increase wellness are often featured on morning TV. The number of people practicing yoga in the US has doubled since 2008. The mindfulness movement touts the health benefits of meditation.

In contrast, we see our friends, neighbors, and family members numb themselves with work, gaming, social media, TV, sex, food, alcohol, and drugs on a regular basis. Sometimes we see ourselves doing the same. If we know we need to feel better, and we know that slowing down to reflect and be present in the moment will help, why do we keep speeding forward?
speed
What’s difficult to admit, much less discuss, is what lies underneath a need to speed through life at a level of maximum distraction. If you have lived in an environment of chaos and/or danger to your physical or emotional well-being that you could not escape, it is excruciatingly hard to sit still and be present. It is also necessary if you are to heal the wounds your spirit has suffered.

It is in this context that I now view the phrase – speed kills. Speed kills our connection to our spirit. This removes us from knowing, accepting, and loving ourselves. It removes us from the very best parts of ourselves. At its worst, this disconnect allows us to act out our anger, hurt, and frustration in vindictive, destructive ways.

In the face of a tragic, hostile act, we often wonder – what kind of person would do that? Often the answer is simple: someone who has suffered in ways you cannot see and may not be able to imagine.

Remaining present and emotionally open in the face of violence, humiliation, rejection, neglect, or shunning, is intolerable for most everyone. It is absolutely healthy in those situations to engage in fighting, fleeing, freezing or fawning in order to protect yourself.

The problem is many, not just some, MANY of us have lived in an environment in which violence, humiliation, rejection, neglect, or shunning were the norm. Living in persistent, unrelenting physical and/or emotional danger creates wounds that are both physical and emotional and result in disconnection from ourselves. Constantly being in a state of fighting, fleeing, freezing or fawning creates long-term barriers to calm, peace, connection and joy.

When we have the strength and courage to sit still and be present, it opens the door for all the emotions we have been avoiding to come rushing in. This is a great opportunity to release those emotions and the hold they have over us. That’s easy to say, but terrifying and hard for many of us to do even if it is worth it in the long run.

I’ve spent years unraveling the knots in my stomach and my spirit. I know that I did not choose the environment that created them. I was born into it. Accepting this hasn’t eliminated the seemingly bottomless well of sadness I feel in my solar plexus. It hasn’t removed every trigger that can send me into an emotional flashback that I simply can’t outthink. (I know this isn’t some particular defect in me. Signals from the amygdala can override executive function, but it still feels terrifying and out of control.)

Mindfulness has helped me rewire my brain away from anxiety toward noticing small ways in which I feel good. I feel less braced for the (as I learned to view the world) next inevitable attack. My new level of awareness lets me deliberately shift my focus in order to feel better in a given moment.

I am painfully aware how difficult it can be to find support for a healing path. Even places we expect to provide a cushion for processing trauma, grief, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms – the therapist’s office, doctor’s office, church, or support groups, may not provide the type of support we need. Feeling unseen, unheard, dismissed, targeted, or misunderstood can leave us feeling even more alone and, sometimes, revictimized.

Healing can bring immediate improvement, but I do not know of a straight or swift path to wholeness. That journey is a process unique to each of us. The best support along the way is to be seen and accepted just as we are at any given moment.

Perhaps this is why I so appreciate Mister Rogers simple affirmation that he likes us just as we are. But I cannot fully receive that message unless I am sitting still.

http://www.doitnow.org/pages/psas.html

http://focusfeatures.com/wont-you-be-my-neighbor/

https://www.fredrogers.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_to_Be…_You_and_Me

https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/untold-story-america-mindfulness-movement/

http://childhood-developmental-disorders.imedpub.com/systematic-review-of-mindfulness-induced-neuroplasticity-in-adults-potential-areas-of-interest-for-the-maturing-adolescent-brain.php?aid=8553

https://seattleyoganews.com/yoga-in-america-2016-statistics/

https://www.speakcdn.com/assets/2497/domestic_violence2.pdf

http://besselvanderkolk.net/the-body-keeps-the-score.html

http://www.traumasensitiveyoga.com/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5518443/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/yoga-perfect-home-workout/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/sometimes-stop-order-start/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/travel-tip-17-stay-home/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”