Search Results for “soy”

August 5, 2019

Should Soy Stay or Should it Go?

Should soy stay or should it go? When my children were young, we discovered they were allergic to cow’s milk. I switched them to soy. Now, when I see headlines describing the dangers of soy, I wonder whether I did them a great disservice.

Soy is present in many prepared foods. It’s eagerly embraced by some adopters of a plant-based diet because it is filled with high-quality protein and nutrients including B vitamins, fiber, potassium, and magnesium. Soy protein contains all nine essential amino acids that the body cannot make on its own making it a “complete” protein. These facts make soy sound like a great food.
soy
But, like eggs, soy has its detractors. Some animal studies have shown that high dosages of isoflavone or isolated soy protein extracts tend to stimulate breast cancer growth. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens that function similarly to human estrogen (a hormone) but with weaker effects. Isoflavones may also alter the behavior of estrogen receptors thereby affecting hormone balance.

Hormone balance affects mood, libido, weight, sleep quality, and energy levels. Life is both healthier and more pleasant when we maintain the proper balance. Any alteration of hormone balance through intentional disruption brings risks whether it’s hormone-based birth control, hormone replacement therapy, or dietary estrogens.

A study of 3700 Japanese-American men in Hawaii who consumed large amounts of tofu during middle-age showed a significant association with greater cognitive impairment and brain atrophy in late life compared with men with the lowest tofu intakes. On the flip side, a study of Asian women showed that soy foods sometimes reduced the risk of breast cancer.

In fact, there are numerous soy studies with conflicting results. At a glance, it’s hard to determine whether soy contributes to or reduces the risk of breast cancer. The relationship with dementia is not certain either.

Soy foods are not the only foods that contain phytoestrogens or dietary estrogens. Flaxseeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts, apples, cranberries, grapes, pomegranates, strawberries, carrots, lentils, yams, mung beans, sprouts, barley, oats, wheat germ, coffee, bourbon, beer, red wine, and olive oil all contain phytoestrogens. We don’t think of most of those as harmful, but all phytoestrogens are not created equal or used by the body in the same way.

More than likely, there are many factors that determine whether soy will detrimentally affect you–ethnicity, hormone levels, type of soy, age and frequency of ingestion, interaction with medications, etc. With no definitive way to know whether phytoestrogens put you at risk, it is probably best to consume soy in moderation.

If you choose packaged foods, be sure to read the labels. You’ll often find soy in unexpected places. If you are eating a plant-based diet, you may want to limit tofu. And with all of the non-dairy milk options, there’s really no reason to rely on soy.

When you do eat soy, less processing is always better. I love edamame. Every few months I’ll have some for dinner two or three times in a week. Then I don’t think about it again for months.

With no consistent, definitive science to rely on at this time, consuming soy has to be a matter of choice. For now I’m choosing stay, but in deliberate moderation. Only time will tell whether my choices will harm my children or me. In the meantime, I’ll probably keep asking: Should soy stay or should it go?

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1345/aph.10257

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01635581.2017.1250924

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2000.10718923

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2781234/

The following is an extensive review of soy research. Please be aware that it was funded by The European Soy and Plant-based Foods Manufacturers Association, and the author is the executive director of the Soy Nutrition Institute, an organization funded by the United Soybean Board and its soy industry members.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5188409/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/?s=soy

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/page/3/?s=soy
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May 4, 2015

Should My Whole Household be Gluten-Free, Wheat-Free, Egg-Free, Dairy-Free, Nut-Free, Shellfish-Free, Soy-Free? Ten Important Considerations

pantry mixI’ve been visiting my son in LA and the question keeps coming up, “Should my whole household be gluten-free?” I think it first arose with the smell of chocolate chip cookies coming from the kitchen. They were for a client and contained the traditional wheat prevalent ingredients.

Of course the aroma piqued our desire for gluten-free chocolate chip cookies as well. It seemed like a good idea to bake both while the oven was hot, but the kitchen hadn’t been fully cleaned from prepping the traditional dough. Was it a good idea to mix up the gluten-free cookies yet?

This question led to a discussion of the labels on the pimento cheese containers and the two containers of yogurt (one used for traditional baking) in the fridge and the stash of teeny tiny jellies in the cupboard which then led to a debate on the possible merits of eliminating all gluten from the household.
contaminated
My family has members who are celiac, gluten-intolerant, allergic to shrimp, and able to eat absolutely anything. If your family is like mine, you’re familiar with the balancing act required to keep the affected parties away from harm while keeping the rest of the family satisfied.

Of course there’s no one size fits all solution for determining what works best, but here are a few things to keep in mind when discussing the options:

1)How severe is the allergy or intolerance?

The last time I ate shrimp, my throat swelled shut and I sounded like I had whooping cough when I tried to breathe. Households with peanut allergies may have experienced the horrible helpless feeling that comes along with severe anaphylaxis. Reactions of this level or that are obviously progressively worse with each exposure mean a food allergen will be eliminated from my house.

With gluten, the response to a tiny amount can vary widely. While I would not cook a gluten-free grilled cheese in the same skillet you just used for your regular sandwich without washing it in between, I have no hesitation about using the same skillet once it’s washed. I’ve never had a problem from a burger cooked on a grill where they heat regular buns. There have been times I’ve inadvertently eaten fries that were fried in the same oil as onion rings without suffering any ill effects. But that’s me and those were unique events. Your experience may be very different.

The severity of response to a particular allergen may require some patient observation. Once my gut had healed on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, I returned to a gluten-free regimen only to discover that I can’t tolerate very much corn. It seems that some of my previously assumed gluten reactions were actually corn related.

2)How is an allergen or irritant stored and who has access to it?

My household has a different rule for medications. Since I have no allergic children or mentally impaired relatives living with me, I don’t mind placing a bottle of aspirin or cough syrup with codeine in the medicine cabinet even though ingesting a single aspirin will have me covered in hives in less than 30 minutes. I simply avoid opening the bottles and consuming the meds.

3)How many people in the household are detrimentally affected by the substance in question?

In the beginning of my gluten-free days, I was one-third of the household and the only one who had to follow the regimen. In other words, I was outnumbered. While I was careful to clean pots, pans, utensils, and surfaces in between, I continued to cook regular pasta, pizza, and dinner rolls for the rest of the family. (A gluten molecule is too large to pass through the skin, so any risk from cleaning up surfaces was easily avoided.) Another option would have been to designate certain pots and pans gluten-free. And, of course there were many more prohibitive options, but it seemed extreme to me to restrict 2/3 of the household as long as I was not suffering any detrimental effects.
GFMix
4)What are the ages and temperaments of the parties at risk?

Young children cannot be expected to read labels on packages or to consistently make good choices. Having a system in place that minimizes their risk and helps them learn at the same time is ideal. Children who tend to follow the rules may respond well to having only gluten-free options in the refrigerator door and a “special” shelf in the pantry from which they are allowed to make their own choices.

Children who are more prone to challenge or mischief may mean a need to eliminate all gluten from the household to minimize your risk as well as theirs. There was some rethinking of my system when my kids decided celiac was a “mental disorder”, meaning it was all in my head, and set out to develop secret tests to see if I would get sick. Funny how all that changed when one of them had to go gluten-free. Ahhhhh, irony…and paybacks! If you have enough patience, these things often work themselves out.

5)What is the cooking environment like?
Is a ceiling fan always running in the kitchen? Is there often a breeze blowing through the open windows or door when you bake? Strong air currents in the kitchen will carry flour particles a long way potentially causing a gluten cross contact problem. You may be careful to clean up the countertop where you’re working, but flour can ride the airwaves across the room to land on gluten-free muffins cooling on another counter.

I always have a cutting board sitting on the peninsula – usually the same one. Are you in the habit of using a single cutting board for everything? Is that cutting board made of a permeable material? How often does it get a thorough cleaning and will you remember to clean it each time it comes in contact with an allergen? All of these things must be considered when determining whether your kitchen environment is conducive to safely using allergens.

6)How many different people in the household cook?

If cooking is a shared duty, it will be necessary to assess the knowledge level and commitment to cooperation of each cook before making a plan.

7)What is your style of cooking or serving food?

Ben and I cook using primarily fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, poultry, and individual baking ingredients. James and my sister use more premixed seasoning packets, boxed meal extenders, and batter mixes. You may purchase mostly precooked, frozen or packaged foods. Some folks put the food in serving bowls, others fill plates in the kitchen, and still others put pots on the table and use a single spoon to dish out the food. You may remove jelly from the jar to your plate with a spoon that never touches your biscuit. We’re in the habit of sticking a knife in the jelly jar to drive my mom crazy. If you do that and smear a piece of regular toast with jelly then stick the knife back in the jelly jar, you’re trailing pieces of toast into the container and contaminating it with gluten.

Your family’s style of cooking and eating will present a unique set of considerations: Are you able to vary the pancake recipe if your child is allergic to eggs and milk? Do you stick your measuring cup in the wheat flour container and then in the sugar when you’re baking? If so, are you willing to break that habit or do you prefer to keep two different containers of sugar so that your gluten-free cupcakes don’t contain contaminated sugar? Are you in the habit of reading labels when pulling something out of the pantry or refrigerator to make sure it doesn’t contain any problem ingredient or do you prefer to be able to use anything in the house without having to think about it?

8)How much space do you have and how organized is your family?

Some families have elaborate storage systems and ample pantry space in which to easily categorize. In my kitchen with its narrow, deep pantry, reused plastic containers are stacked on plastic pull-out organizer drawers from The Container Store. It’s not unusual to see trail of white rice flour on the top of the sorghum flour container. Adding a container of wheat flour to this collection would be ill advised even if it were clearly labeled. In a different environment, a labeling system would be sufficient for preventing cross contact.
cans
9)How much waste will be created by having a dual system?

The discussions that prompted this post have often centered on how much food is getting thrown away. If everything were gluten-free in my son’s house, there would be less waste. Of course this means that to get a consensus for such an arrangement, there must be a high standard for the taste and texture of the gluten-free food so that it is pleasing to everyone. Households like this are one of the reasons Cooking2Thrive is committed to developing gluten-free recipes that go beyond providing an acceptable substitute in order to please the discerning gluten-eating palate.

10)Is it more costly to remove all allergens and irritants from the household or to purchase some of both?

Even with the finances, there’s no specific formula for deciding which will cost more. The answer will vary depending on how many packaged foods you buy, how many different allergies or sensitivities you must accommodate, and whether or not you end up regularly throwing away food. The more data you collect and the more accurate your observations, the greater your ability to determine this outcome.

There’s rarely an easy answer to the question, “Should my whole household be gluten-free, wheat-free, egg-free, dairy-free, nut-free, shellfish-free, soy-free?”, but exploring the options will make you more aware of your habits and the concerns of other family members. That is valuable information upon which to build. My family has found that developing an acceptable plan can reduce stress in the household and make it easier to support each other’s health.

And that would be a good thing for most families…problem is, we LIKE to argue the relative merits of pretty much anything. Of course, you can help us out. Start a whole new discussion by telling us how things work in your household.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

September 30, 2019

Gluten-Free Halloween Treats for 2019

We’re only a hop, skip, and jump away from Halloween, and it’s a great time for us to bring you a list of fun, gluten-free Halloween treats for 2019. My kids always loved Halloween. I have great photos of them as cowboys, rodeo clowns, Rambo, and Pee Wee Herman. But it wasn’t all about the costumes; it was also about the treats!
halloween
Of course it’s important to have treats that are good to your tummy. Since we have to be gluten-free, we compiled a list of gluten-free treats for this Halloween and now we want to share…

Zombie SKITTLES®
Zombies are on the march and will soon arrive in your town. Flavors include Petrifying Citrus Punch, Mummified Melon, Boogeyman Blackberry, Chilling Black Cherry, and Blood Red Berry. There’s a rotten Zombie hidden in each pack ready to attack your palate with grossness so watch out!
Ingredients: Sugar, corn syrup, hydrogenated palm kernel oil; less than 2% of: citric acid, tapioca dextrin, modified corn starch, natural and artificial flavors, colors (red 40 lake, blue 2 lake, yellow 6 lake, yellow 5 lake, blue 1 lake, titanium dioxide, yellow 6, yellow 5, red 40, blue 1), sodium citrate, carnauba wax.

SweeTARTS® Skulls and Bones
This Halloween, SweeTARTS will come in the shape of skulls & bones in 5 colors and flavors: Blue Punch (blue), Cherry (red), Grape (purple), Lemon (yellow), and Green Apple (green).
Ingredients: Dextrose, maltodextrin, malic acid, and less than 2% calcium stearate, natural flavors, blue 2 lake, red 40 lake, yellow 5 lake.

Hershey’s Miniatures
Always a favorite, these tiny chocolates will appear in glow-in-the-dark wrappers in time for trick-or-treating. Please note these contain milk.
Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar, milk, chocolate, cocoa butter, lactose, milk fat, soy lecithin, polyglycerol polyricinoleat (PGPR), emulsifier, vanillin, artificial flavor).

Reese’s Stuffed With Pieces in the Shape of a Pumpkin
Take a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, stuff it with Reese’s Pieces and smash it into a pumpkin, ta-da! There you have Reese’s Halloween feature. While these are gluten-free, they contain both peanuts and milk.
Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar, cocoa butter, chocolate, nonfat milk, milk fat, lactose, lecithin (soy), PBPR, emulsifier), peanuts, sugar, dextrose, partially defatted peanuts, hydrogenated vegetable oil (palm kernel oil, soybean oil), contains 2% or less of: corn syrup, salt, palm kernel oil, artificial color (yellow 5 lake, yellow 6 lake, red 40 lake, blue 1 lake), confectioner’s glaze, lecithin (soy), modified cornstarch, TBHQ and citric acid to maintain freshness, carnuaba wax, vanillin, artificial flavor.

Frankford® Gummy Body Parts
Gruesome gummy eyeballs, brains and severed fingers, feet, and ears. Truly a haunting sight!
Ingredients: Glucose syrup, sugar, gelatin (beef), sorbitol, citric acid, malic acid, pectin, artificial flavors, carnauba wax, palm kernel oil, sodium citrate, artificial colors (yellow 6, blue 1, yellow 5, red 40, titanium dioxide).

Tootsie Caramel Apple Orchard Pops
Want the flavor of a caramel apple without having to make one? Try these suckers from Tootsie. They’re available in green apple, golden delicious, and macintosh flavors. Each flavor includes chewy caramel which means they include milk.
Ingredients: Sugar, corn syrup, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, skim milk, heavy cream, malic acid, whey, salt, artificial flavors, sodium caseinate, soy lecithin, artificial colors (including FD&C Blue1, FD&C Red 40), turmeric coloring.

Charms® Candy Corn Pops
Think of these as candy corn that you eat from a stick.
Ingredients: Sugar, corn syrup, salt, artificial flavor, artificial colors (including FD&C red 40 blue 1), turmeric coloring, titanium dioxide. Milk and soy may be present.

Blood Bites Oozing Candy Blood Bags with Glow-in-the-Dark Fangs
All fangs look better when covered in blood! These fangs come with blood bags of oozing watermelon flavored candy. Yum!
Ingredients: Corn syrup, sugar, water, pectin, xanthan gum, citric acid, artificial flavor, red 40, sodium citrate.

Espeez Old Fashioned Rock Candy on a Stick
The novelty will please your kids and the nostalgia will please your parents. These bright colored sticks are made in a gluten-free, nut-free facility and are both Kosher Parve and Halal certified.
Ingredients: Pure cane sugar, less than 2% of the following–natural and artificial flavors, FD&C (Red 3, Blue 1, Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6) caramel color, titanium dioxide.

PEZ® Party Halloween Bag
PEZ candy is peanut, tree nut, and gluten-free. Party bag includes 12 mini dispensers, each individually wrapped with one assorted fruit PEZ Candy roll. There are two of each design in the bag: Black Cat, Ghost, Spider in Spiderweb, Pumpkin, Owl with Witch Hat and Bats.
Ingredients: Corn syrup, adipic acid, hydrogenated palm kernel & palm oils, mono & diglycerides, natural & artificial flavors, artificial colors FD&C red 3, yellow 5, yellow 6, blue 2.

If your friends and family have varied allergies and sensitivities, you may want to order treats from No Whey! Foods. Everything they make is 100% milk-free, peanut-free, tree nut-free, gluten-free, egg-free, soy-free, vegan and kosher. They also do not use artificial colors and flavors.

No Whey’s Halloween selections include Skull Pops, Spook Free Chocolatey Bars, Spook Free PeaNot Cups, Spook Free milkless caramel & nougat in a chocolatey coating, Spider Pops, and more.

With fun costumes and tummy-friendly treats Halloween can be the best holiday of the year for your gluten-free child!

https://www.nowheychocolate.com/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/allergen-free-halloween-treats-you-can-share-with-the-class/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/halloween-treats-dont-candy/

Portions of this list were compiled from advance information. Please read labels in the store or online before purchasing.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

June 3, 2019

Ice Cold Non-Dairy Treats for Summer

The temperature outside has hit the 90-degree mark and it’s time for ice cold non-dairy treats! Last summer I could still consume ice cream as long as it was gluten-free. This summer, I need a non-dairy treat.

When ordering my groceries last week, I discovered avocado based non-dairy frozen desserts. It was a clicking accident but I decided to try the Deep Dark Chocolate nonetheless. The flavor was rich chocolate. There was no hint of avocado taste, and the avocado base created a creamy texture that made it seem very much like ice cream. I wouldn’t want to eat a whole meal of it, but I enjoyed the creamy denseness.
ice cold
Cado’s seven dessert flavors contain only 12 grams of sugar and 170 calories per serving. These pints are plant-based, vegan, and soy free but contain guar gum and gum acacia. I’m curious whether a lighter flavor would let a bit of avocado flavor come through. I think I’ll try Simply Lemon in order to find out.

I like Talenti® Alphonso Mango Sorbetto. The primary ingredient is Mango and a 2/3 cup serving has 160 calories. It’s a sweet treat so it contains sugar. It also has 2 grams of fiber. The only thing I’m not really fond of is the addition of Carob Bean Gum.

Alphonso Mango Sorbetto is not the only dairy-free flavor from Talenti. There’s Roman Raspberry, Peanut Butter Fudge, and Cold Brew Coffee. The raspberry is just as appealing as the mango, but harder to find locally. I haven’t tried the other two.

If you eat dairy, Talenti offers a wide range of gelato flavors. Many are gluten-free and can be found under a gluten-free tab on the Talenti website. These include Organic Ginger Matcha, Peppermint Bark, and Vanilla Chai.

When I want something on a stick, I reach for Luna & Larry’s Coconut Bliss® Organic Dark Chocolate Bars. I think I’ve mentioned these before. I often keep a box in the freezer. One melt-in-your-mouth bar has 140 calories. I like both the flavor and texture of these treats made from coconut milk, agave syrup, cocoa, and vanilla extract. Difficult to avoid in frozen treats, the coconut milk contains guar gum as a filler.

All Coconut Bliss flavors are certified gluten-free — even the Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough. Some flavors come bars. Others are in pint cartons. A 2/3 cup serving of Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough has 330 calories. The Ginger Cookie + Caramel has 330 calories per serving and the Sweet Cherry Amaretto 260. Unfortunately,

There are other non-dairy frozen desserts available. Steve’s Ice Cream Burnt Sugar Vanilla sounds delicious, but it’s not sold in stores in my area. I’ll make it a point to seek some out when I’m traveling.

Ben & Jerry’s®, Halo Top®, So Delicious®, NadaMoo! and Snow Monkey also produce highly acclaimed dairy-free ice creams. I’ve tried a dairy version of Halo Top that would not make my short list, but the non-dairy version may stand out.

Of course, you don’t have to take my word for any of this. Is there really a downside in getting out there and trying LOTS of these yourself? I don’t think so.

Enjoy some for me too!

UPDATE:I tried the Cado Simply Lemon and Mint Chocolate Chip flavors. Neither is as pleasing as the Deep Dark Chocolate. After a bite or two, the Simply Lemon was too lemony. I feel this way about most products that include lemon oil. Lemon juice might have had enough flavor on its own. The mint chocolate chip was okay, but one bite did not leave me wanting another one.

https://www.talentigelato.com/products/alphonso-mango-2

https://www.talentigelato.com/product-category/dairy-free-sorbetto

https://coconutbliss.com/product-details/dark-chocolate-bars/

http://cadoicecream.com/

https://stevesicecream.com/index.html#WhereToBuy

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/my-five-feel-good-things-for-the-week/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/summer-ice-cream/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”