Archive for November, 2018

November 26, 2018

New Life for Leftovers

This week is a good time to create a new life for leftovers. In general I don’t mind leftovers, but I have my limits. Once I’m tired of eating a particular holiday menu item, I like to repurpose it to make it palatable again. If I don’t, I’ll be tempted to throw away perfectly good food.

Leftover plans have to be flexible because I never know exactly what will be eaten, what will be taken home by my family, and what will stay in my refrigerator. When incorporating leftovers into other dishes, I just work from a general framework and make things up as I go.

Turkey quickly becomes a turkey/avocado/bacon wrap using gluten-free tortillas or paleo wraps. Sometimes I go full turkey club by adding tomato, lettuce, and cheese to the wrap.

If you have leftover turkey and gravy, it’s easy to make creamed turkey on toast. It’s the same idea as chipped beef on toast and has that same retro feel of grandma’s kitchen.
corn
This year I ended up with lots of corn. I’m going to use it in Mexican cornbread, but I could make corn/potato chowder or corn casserole. I could also include it along with other veggies in a frittata. Frittatas are always an easy, delicious, gluten-free way to repurpose cooked vegetables.

If you have too much stuffing, consider turning it into a bottom crust for shepherd’s pie. If you have them, the filling can be made with leftover turkey, vegetables, and gravy. If you don’t, create a filling using breakfast sausage, green peas, and a little sour cream. Top off either version with mashed potatoes or mashed sweet potatoes before baking.

Winter weather often accompanies the holidays making warm, cozy soup an appealing option. Mashed potatoes and gravy can become the base for a thick, creamy soup. Corn and green beans can be incorporated into vegetable soup.

Fresh cranberry/orange relish makes the perfect topping for an almond torte. We always have extra relish. We all love it, but it’s not something you want to eat in large servings and it’s such a strong, tart flavor that it doesn’t always pair well with other strong flavors. On the other hand, its strong flavor enhances the mild flavor of the torte.

Last year, I used a leftover sweet potato to create a topping for panna cotta. It was so good everyone asked for it again this year! Here’s the recipe if you’d like to try it:

Sweet Potato Topping

1/2 cup cooked sweet potato
2 tbsp maple syrup
1 1/2 tbsp salted butter
1 tbsp heavy whipping cream
1 tbsp + 1/2 tsp honey
Pinch of salt

Place sweet potato and maple syrup in food chopper or blender and purée until smooth. In medium skillet, melt butter. Add puréed sweet potato. Whisk in cream and honey and sprinkle with salt. Cook for a minute or two. Allow to cool.

I’m not sure why I thought to turn that sweet potato into topping, but I’m glad I did. That’s the great thing about creating new life for leftovers; you can end up with unexpectedly good food that would never have been thought of otherwise.

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/lighten/

November 19, 2018

Cough Drop Pep Talk for Thanksgiving?

Do I really need a cough drop pep talk for Thanksgiving? Why does my cough drop wrapper say, “A PEP TALK IN EVERY DROP” anyway? If I have fever high enough to think cough drops talk, I need something besides a pep talk. The pesky little ovals don’t stop there. They advise me to “Buckle down and push forth!”; “Power Through!”; and “Seize the day.” Whaaat?
coughdrop
Maybe I’m just in a bad mood because I can’t sleep, my throat hurts, and my ear is full of fluid. Eating green beans, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, and oranges may be culinary medicine, but they aren’t doing the trick to kick this virus. Now, I’m out of food and I don’t want to get out in the cold to go to the store.

Should I take the cough drop wrapper’s advice and power through? After all, I just have a cold, not the flu. OMG, I’m rhyming in a blog post – I must be sick. That aside, I don’t like clothes with affirmations on the tags or wrappers that tell me what to do. It’s not that I mind affirmations, I just don’t like them in my clothes. It makes me feel like a walking fortune cookie. And it’s not that I don’t sometimes need to be told to buck up, I just don’t want that advice from something I take when I’m sick. It seems inappropriate.

If the wrapper said, “A delicious complement to hot tea.” or “Stay home and sleep.” or “A warm snuggle for your throat!” or “Take time to heal.”, perhaps I could get behind wrapper advice. But telling me to be unstoppable is really bad advice when I’m ill.

The people following that advice are more likely to go to work, church, and the store, sick. They’re more likely to stay stick longer. They’re more likely to be too tired to do their best at work or be as safe a driver as usual on the road. And no doubt they will contaminate the air on my next flight. So stop encouraging them already!

Most of us have been programmed to keep going when we would get well faster if we went to bed and got some rest. We feel like we can’t miss work or class, a family birthday, or a soccer game. Many bosses are happy to reinforce this belief.

And then there’s all of that holiday cooking to be done! That’s certainly something we shouldn’t be doing when we’re sick. Seriously, preparing food for others when you’re sick can expose them. Most states have food prep guidelines for restaurant employees that include restrictions for those with cold, flu, and bronchitis as well as more serious illnesses.

I know it’s tempting to minimize the risks when we think of beloved holiday traditions, but if someone in your family has a compromised immune system, exposure to the flu could put them at serious risk even if they’ve had the vaccine. Having a medically fragile grandchild has increased my awareness of the need to be mindful about spreading germs. It also means I felt the frustration of missing out when the family welcomed her home from a recent hospitalization.

Perhaps those cough drop pep talks are meant to encourage malingering patients to get back to the business of every day, but they’re most likely to feed the determination of those who won’t stop in the first place. If we want to assist our immune systems, it is important to recognize the value of down time. Resting leaves our bodies with more energy available to fight off bugs and rebuild cells.

So, if you’re sick this holiday season, forget the cough drop pep talk! Eat some soup. Order food. Go to bed. Take time to heal. Not only will you get well faster in the long run, you’ll help contain the spread of viruses and/or bacteria.

Now it’s time for me to follow my own advice and take a healing nap!!!

http://www.moodmaybe.com/2016/05/flax-affirmations.html

https://www.gethalls.com/

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0215-enough-sleep.html

http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/dwi/eicondguide.pdf

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/easy-gluten-free-thanksgiving-menu/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/small-crowd-small-bird-cornish-game-hen-thanksgiving/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/hosting-thanksgiving-easy/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

November 12, 2018

Some Medical Schools Now Offer Classes in Culinary Medicine

Some medical schools now offer classes in culinary medicine. In the realm of recent Western modern medicine, that could easily be assumed to be instruction on suturing knife wounds and avoiding cross contamination. Actually, the news is more exciting than that! Tulane University School of Medicine created the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine and introduced a 60-credit curriculum for medical students. The program has now partnered with over 50 medical and nursing schools.
prep
Many people seek nutritional advice from their physician. It seems logical because that same physician often advises a healthy diet and exercise to prevent or improve disease progression. Often the doctor then refers the patient to a nutrition counselor with no additional discussion. That referral is often where the cycle ends.

While the physician may be aware of current dietary recommendations for the amount of protein, fat, or sugar consumption, he/she may not know much about the art of cooking. The doctor won’t necessarily know what flavors and textures play well together when adding vegetables to traditional dishes to make them nutritionally rich. Even a nutritionist may not be skilled in the practical kitchen application of preparing healthy meals within a realistic time frame and budget.

Thanks in part to the wandering career of Tulane’s Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP, CCMS, who leads the team at Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, that’s beginning to change. A large shift in the practice of medicine will take time, but I find this beginning of change thrilling!

Before he became a physician, Dr. Harlan discovered his love of food. He learned cooking techniques from chefs during the time he managed and owned restaurants. While training at Emory University School of Medicine, he began writing about the link between food and health. He now serves as Executive Director of the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine.

The Goldring Center has developed a 60-credit curriculum that includes online nutrition training and live conferences as well as attendance at hands-on teaching kitchen modules. Completion of the course can result in earning the designation of Certified Culinary Medicine Specialist (CCMS). Physicians, Physicians Assistants, Pharmacists, Registered Dietitians and Nurse Practitioners are eligible for certification.

When you visit a practitioner with the CCMS certification, you will have the advantage of that clinician’s knowledge of how to incorporate healthy eating into your diet. Not only can they provide nutrition information, they have been trained in culinary techniques to prepare food that is consistent with real-world budgets and time constraints. That’s the sort of detailed support that can make you feel like you can succeed without being overwhelmed.

What I like about this approach is the practical aspect. If a practitioner actually has hands-on experience, it is much easier to offer real solutions that will resonate. The minute a patient realizes a doctor has no idea about cooking or feeding a family of 5 on a budget, they are likely to tune her out or adopt an attitude that he has no business telling them what to eat. After all, that practitioner clearly doesn’t understand the patient’s circumstances.

The Goldring Center also offers free cooking/nutrition classes for the community supported in part by a Celebrity Chef Dinner Series in which renowned regional chefs prepare a multi-course meal with wine pairings at the center. Not only does this bring additional connection with the community, it keeps reminds us that healthy food can also be delicious food. This is a mantra that bears repeating, especially when it comes to gluten-free food.

Good nutrition is the basis for mental and motor development in children and good health in adults. At long last, modern medicine is incorporating food preparation into the practice of medicine. This is a welcome shift.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4379645/

https://culinarymedicine.org/

https://www.healthmeetsfood.com/

https://www.drgourmet.com/pr/#.W-mnY4FKjnE
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November 5, 2018

I Can’t Wait for Grocery Delivery!

I can’t wait for grocery delivery! Creating and testing gluten-free recipes means I can never shop at just one store. I’d rather spend my time in the kitchen than traveling to and from the grocery or walking through the aisles. Building a favorites list online will allow me to spend a minimum amount of time shopping and get all of the basics delivered right to my door. I love that idea!
carts
In preparation for the eventuality of grocery delivery, I’ve been clicking and picking up. My primary concern before I began was the quality of produce. Even when I do the shopping, it’s frequently difficult to find high quality, fresh produce in our local stores. Nonetheless, I decided to dive in.

Of course I can have nonperishables shipped from Amazon any time. I’ve previously purchased things like paper towels and G.H. Cretors popcorn from them. I didn’t enjoy the experience of having to fill a pantry box in order to get free shipping. I hated the way the items were packaged when they arrived. And I had to make sure someone was available to check my porch so the boxes didn’t disappear. That’s not the experience I’m looking for.

Subscriptions work well for some items like coffee. In fact, Jim’s Organic just started a subscription service. I signed up the minute I got an email announcing subscription availability. But coffee is something on which I can easily gauge my usage. I’m not as methodical about my consumption of paper towels or cereal.

In my market, there are two stores that offer click and pick-up service – Kroger and Wal-Mart. I chose Wal-Mart because they have a plan for $10 delivery in the near future. Each time I order from the site, I build familiarity with the product selection and add to my favorites list.

Downloading the app means I don’t have to call upon arrival. Once I receive a notice that the order is ready, I check in from my phone when I’m on the way. When I arrive, the store is notified and brings out the order.

This means that I’m allowing the app to track my location. This can be a privacy concern. If so, there’s an option to receive notification via email, drive to the store location, and call the number listed on a sign found in each parking spot in the pick-up area.
produce
Last week I added sugar snap peas to a pickup order. That evening, I popped the package open, washed a few and ate them raw. I was pleasantly surprised! The peas were crunchy, tender, and sweet. They were the freshest, tastiest produce I’ve had all year. That worry I had about the quality of produce is beginning to wane.

I’m attending a film festival out of town. There’s nothing in my refrigerator at home besides butter, jelly, and pickle relish. This week will be the perfect time to add more produce to an order and see if the peas were a fluke. I hope not. A pattern of reliably fresh produce and the deal will be sealed! Online grocery shopping will become a regular thing for me.

When grocery delivery begins…score!!! I really can’t wait!

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/what-makes-a-grocery-store-great/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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