November 12, 2018

Some Medical Schools Now Offer Classes in Culinary Medicine

Some medical schools now offer classes in culinary medicine. In the realm of recent Western modern medicine, that could easily be assumed to be instruction on suturing knife wounds and avoiding cross contamination. Actually, the news is more exciting than that! Tulane University School of Medicine created the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine and introduced a 60-credit curriculum for medical students. The program has now partnered with over 50 medical and nursing schools.
prep
Many people seek nutritional advice from their physician. It seems logical because that same physician often advises a healthy diet and exercise to prevent or improve disease progression. Often the doctor then refers the patient to a nutrition counselor with no additional discussion. That referral is often where the cycle ends.

While the physician may be aware of current dietary recommendations for the amount of protein, fat, or sugar consumption, he/she may not know much about the art of cooking. The doctor won’t necessarily know what flavors and textures play well together when adding vegetables to traditional dishes to make them nutritionally rich. Even a nutritionist may not be skilled in the practical kitchen application of preparing healthy meals within a realistic time frame and budget.

Thanks in part to the wandering career of Tulane’s Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP, CCMS, who leads the team at Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, that’s beginning to change. A large shift in the practice of medicine will take time, but I find this beginning of change thrilling!

Before he became a physician, Dr. Harlan discovered his love of food. He learned cooking techniques from chefs during the time he managed and owned restaurants. While training at Emory University School of Medicine, he began writing about the link between food and health. He now serves as Executive Director of the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine.

The Goldring Center has developed a 60-credit curriculum that includes online nutrition training and live conferences as well as attendance at hands-on teaching kitchen modules. Completion of the course can result in earning the designation of Certified Culinary Medicine Specialist (CCMS). Physicians, Physicians Assistants, Pharmacists, Registered Dietitians and Nurse Practitioners are eligible for certification.

When you visit a practitioner with the CCMS certification, you will have the advantage of that clinician’s knowledge of how to incorporate healthy eating into your diet. Not only can they provide nutrition information, they have been trained in culinary techniques to prepare food that is consistent with real-world budgets and time constraints. That’s the sort of detailed support that can make you feel like you can succeed without being overwhelmed.

What I like about this approach is the practical aspect. If a practitioner actually has hands-on experience, it is much easier to offer real solutions that will resonate. The minute a patient realizes a doctor has no idea about cooking or feeding a family of 5 on a budget, they are likely to tune her out or adopt an attitude that he has no business telling them what to eat. After all, that practitioner clearly doesn’t understand the patient’s circumstances.

The Goldring Center also offers free cooking/nutrition classes for the community supported in part by a Celebrity Chef Dinner Series in which renowned regional chefs prepare a multi-course meal with wine pairings at the center. Not only does this bring additional connection with the community, it keeps reminds us that healthy food can also be delicious food. This is a mantra that bears repeating, especially when it comes to gluten-free food.

Good nutrition is the basis for mental and motor development in children and good health in adults. At long last, modern medicine is incorporating food preparation into the practice of medicine. This is a welcome shift.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4379645/

https://culinarymedicine.org/

https://www.healthmeetsfood.com/

https://www.drgourmet.com/pr/#.W-mnY4FKjnE

November 5, 2018

I Can’t Wait for Grocery Delivery!

I can’t wait for grocery delivery! Creating and testing gluten-free recipes means I can never shop at just one store. I’d rather spend my time in the kitchen than traveling to and from the grocery or walking through the aisles. Building a favorites list online will allow me to spend a minimum amount of time shopping and get all of the basics delivered right to my door. I love that idea!
carts
In preparation for the eventuality of grocery delivery, I’ve been clicking and picking up. My primary concern before I began was the quality of produce. Even when I do the shopping, it’s frequently difficult to find high quality, fresh produce in our local stores. Nonetheless, I decided to dive in.

Of course I can have nonperishables shipped from Amazon any time. I’ve previously purchased things like paper towels and G.H. Cretors popcorn from them. I didn’t enjoy the experience of having to fill a pantry box in order to get free shipping. I hated the way the items were packaged when they arrived. And I had to make sure someone was available to check my porch so the boxes didn’t disappear. That’s not the experience I’m looking for.

Subscriptions work well for some items like coffee. In fact, Jim’s Organic just started a subscription service. I signed up the minute I got an email announcing subscription availability. But coffee is something on which I can easily gauge my usage. I’m not as methodical about my consumption of paper towels or cereal.

In my market, there are two stores that offer click and pick-up service – Kroger and Wal-Mart. I chose Wal-Mart because they have a plan for $10 delivery in the near future. Each time I order from the site, I build familiarity with the product selection and add to my favorites list.

Downloading the app means I don’t have to call upon arrival. Once I receive a notice that the order is ready, I check in from my phone when I’m on the way. When I arrive, the store is notified and brings out the order.

This means that I’m allowing the app to track my location. This can be a privacy concern. If so, there’s an option to receive notification via email, drive to the store location, and call the number listed on a sign found in each parking spot in the pick-up area.
produce
Last week I added sugar snap peas to a pickup order. That evening, I popped the package open, washed a few and ate them raw. I was pleasantly surprised! The peas were crunchy, tender, and sweet. They were the freshest, tastiest produce I’ve had all year. That worry I had about the quality of produce is beginning to wane.

I’m attending a film festival out of town. There’s nothing in my refrigerator at home besides butter, jelly, and pickle relish. This week will be the perfect time to add more produce to an order and see if the peas were a fluke. I hope not. A pattern of reliably fresh produce and the deal will be sealed! Online grocery shopping will become a regular thing for me.

When grocery delivery begins…score!!! I really can’t wait!

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/what-makes-a-grocery-store-great/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

October 29, 2018

Veggies in the Oven Make the Kitchen Toasty Warm

Veggies in the oven make the kitchen toasty warm and I love that on a cool fall day! Whether you roast or bake, the oven is a wonderful place to cook vegetables!
cabbage
Before the advent of microwave ovens, pretty much everyone baked potatoes and sweet potatoes in their full size, conventional oven. It wasn’t as common to roast or bake other vegetables unless they were cut up in some kind of casserole. A quick look at the 1953 edition of Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book advises boiling most vegetables in a small amount of water.

cookbookMy grandmother fried okra, but boiled carrots, broccoli, corn, cauliflower, cabbage, squash, turnips, and green beans. She even made stuffed bell peppers in her pressure cooker, not in the oven.

I’m not sure why I started cooking vegetables in the oven, but I love the results! Cauliflower is one of my favorites to roast. I cut it into small florets, then toss it in olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and red pepper flakes. I roast the florets until they have some black edges. Yum! I wish I had some right now.

My newest favorite is baked red cabbage with herbed butter. If I start by making extra butter, I can easily turn this into a sheet pan meal by adding pork chops and red seedless grapes. I place the pork chops in the center of the pan and salt and pepper on each side. Then I alternate grapes still on stems and cabbage wedges around the edge of the pan and drizzle all of it with butter. The baking time is the same, but I turn the pork chops halfway through.

Here’s the recipe for enough butter for a sheet pan meal:

6 tbsp salted butter
4 – 5 sprigs fresh rosemary
1 – 2 sprigs fresh mint
3 cloves garlic, peeled
Sprinkle of salt

Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Add rosemary, mint, and garlic. Sprinkle with salt. Simmer on low for 10-15 minutes. Remove herbs & garlic.

To bake one head of red cabbage, cut it into small wedges and place on aluminum foil in a sheet pan or other baking pan. Lightly salt, then drizzle with herbed butter. (You’ll need 1/4 to 1/3 of the butter for the cabbage.) Place in preheated 375 oven and bake for 40-45 minutes. Serve hot!
oven cab
If you decide to try this recipe, make sure to purchase red cabbage rather than radicchio. While they look similar, the two are not the same. Radicchio is a member of the bitter-flavored chicory family along with Belgian endive, frisée, and escarole.

When the cabbage bakes, the color becomes an even deeper purple. It’s a beautiful addition to a plate. And when cooked this way, I prefer the flavor to that of green cabbage. That may be a good thing during cold and flu season. A cup of red cabbage contains 85% of the daily value of vitamin C.

A toasty warm kitchen. A beautiful, delicious, healthy baked vegetable and left-over herbed butter to use on pork chops or include in pasta sauce. OMG! Does it get any better than this?

https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2373/2

http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/veg/cabbage/

http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/veg/radicchio/

https://www.thespruceeats.com/types-of-chicories-4040928

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/dont-like-peeling-butternut-squash-then-dont/

October 22, 2018

Allergen Free Halloween Treats You Can Share With The Class

If you’re looking for allergen free Halloween Treats you can share with your child’s class, we have a few for you to consider. It can be hard to find treats that are free of all the major allergens, but when it comes to sharing with classmates, you don’t want anyone to be left out. Luckily, this year there are some fun options available!

Sweets Indeed has packaged various forms of candy in vials with Halloween themed names. The vials come in packs of 12. Some are a mixture of liquid and pellet candies. Some have crystals and powder. All of them look like great fun!

At this moment, it’s less expensive to purchase these items from Amazon than it is direct from Sweets. A 12 pack is $14.95 on Amazon and $19.95 from Sweets.
blood
Blood Sweet Candy

The Blood Sweet Candy set includes 6 vials of Blood Sample Sour Cherry Liquid Candy and 6 vials of Blood Clots Wild Cherry Candy Pebbles

The vials look gruesome and gross just like kids prefer! With sugar, corn syrup, and fructose as the main ingredients, I won’t say these are healthy treats, but few Halloween treats are.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Liquid Candy: Corn Syrup, Fructose, Water, Sugar, Malic Acid, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/bloody-sweet-candy-12-pack

monster
Monster Fun Candy

The Monster Fun set is comprised of 2 vials of Vampire Blood Black Cherry Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Monster Slime Green Apple Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Witches Potion Grape Liquid Candy, 2 vials of Jack’s Ashes Orange Candy Powder, 2 vials of Devil Dust Strawberry Candy Powder, and 2 vials of Werewolf Dandruff Root Beer Candy Powder.

Ingredients
Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

Liquid Candy: Corn Syrup, Fructose, Water, Sugar, Malic Acid, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/monster-fun-candy-12-pack

Ghost
Ghost Fun Candy

If you choose Ghost Fun, you’ll get 6 vials of Ghost Toot Dust Vanilla Candy Powder plus 6 vials of Ghost Boogers Vanilla Candy Pebbles.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/ghost-fun-candy-12-pack

undeadZombie Fun Candy

Can candy be undead? I guess it can. Order Zombie Fun and get 6 vials of Zombie Toot Dust Sour Apple Candy Powder and 6 vials of Zombie Boogers Green Apple Candy Powder.

Ingredients
Candy Pebbles: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

Candy Powder: Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors, Natural Mica based Titanium Dioxide Pigments

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/collections/halloween/products/zombie-fun-candy-12-pack

unicorn
Unicorn Boogers

What kid hasn’t eaten boogers? Now it can be a parent sanctioned activity! Unicorn Boogers include Fruity Candy Pebbles along with Sugar Crystals. The candy pebbles flavors are key lime, lemonade, watermelon, wild berry, tangerine and blue raspberry. Then there are glimmer white sugar crystals. Apparently Boogers come at a premium. They’re $21.95 for 12 vials from either Sweets or Amazon.

Ingredients
Sugar, Dextrose, Dextrin, Malic Acid, Corn Syrup, Artificial Flavors & Colors

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/unicorn-boogers-8-pack

Zombie Bawlz

Your treats don’t have to come in vials. Zombie Bawlz Chewy Fruit Sours come in a bag filled with Cherry, Watermelon and Green Apple chewy flavors. They’re $10 per bag from Sweets. On Amazon, you can get two bags for that amount of money.

Ingredients
Corn Syrup, Sugar, Dextrose, Malic Acid, Citric Acid, Modified Corn Starch, Sodium Citrate, Carnuba Wax, Bees Wax, Confectioner’s Glaze, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Caramel Color, Yellow #5, Yellow #6 Lake, Red #40, Red #40 Lake, Blue #1, Blue #2 Lake

https://www.shopsweetsindeed.com/products/zombie-bawlz

If none of these treats appeal to you, Sixlets® offers 3 flavors of gluten-free, nut-free, kosher candies that contain no artificial colors or sweeteners. It should be noted that these candies do contain milk and soy.

A box of 72 tubes can be purchased from Amazon for $13.07 and is eligible for Prime shipping. Each tube has 23 calories. Choose from Original Sixlets Chocolatey Candies, Chewy Sixlets Fruity Flavored Candies, and Fruity Sixlets Chocolatey Candies.

The original flavor features a chocolatey center containing cocoa and carob and a crunchy candy coating. Chewy Sixlets Fruity Flavored Candies come in Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Blue Raspberry, and Green Apple. You can enjoy Fruity Sixlets Chocolatey Candies in Blueberry, Strawberry, Raspberry, Banana, Orange flavor.

https://sixlets.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw6rXeBRD3ARIsAD9ni9AQfHbJuL0jMrH1pPCZ4aeIMDxXnpGtY0N95QZE2CMVhoggoFGW0QwaAgSnEALw_wcB

With Halloween more than a week away, there’s plenty of time to get your treats ordered and delivered in time. Choosing treats with fewer allergens is a thoughtful and kind gesture for you to make to your child’s allergic classmates.

Happy Halloween!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/halloween-treats-dont-candy/

http://www.cooking2thrive.com/blog/trick-or-treat/

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